Computational and Scientific Engineering Gauss Centre for Supercomputing e.V.

COMPUTATIONAL AND SCIENTIFIC ENGINEERING

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Andreas Kempf, Chair for Fluid Dynamics, University of Duisburg-Essen

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: GCS-snef

Shock-tube experiments are a classical technique to provide data for reaction mechanisms and thus help to reduce emissions and increase the efficiency of combustion processes. A shock-tube experiment at critical conditions (low temperature), where the ignition occurs far away from the end wall, is simulated. Understanding the mechanism that leads to such a remote ignition is crucial to improve the quality of future experiments.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Thorsten Lutz, Institute of Aerodynamics and Gas Dynamics (IAG), University of Stuttgart (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: WEAloads

As part of the WindForS project WINSENT two wind turbines and four met masts will be installed in the Swabian Alps in Southern Germany for research proposes. The results of highly resolved numerical simulations of this wind energy test site located in complex terrain are shown. By means of Delayed Detached Eddy Simulations (DDES) the turbulent flow above a forested steep slope is analyzed in order to evaluate the inflow conditions of the planned wind turbine in detail. The complex inflow conditions and production of turbulence due to the shape of the topography and the vegetation are evaluated. The intention of using supercomputers for these applications is to analyze the local atmospheric flow field in as much detail as possible.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Eckart Laurien, Institute of Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems (IKE), University of Stuttgart (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen

Local Project ID: TurboCon3

The accident management in a generic nuclear power plant containment with a convection flow of high-temparature gases is simulated. An activated spray mixes the turbulent flow and inhibits the formation of a possibly explosive upper region filled with hydrogen. Condensation of the steam is promoted and the maximum pressure, which may also endanger the containment integrity, is limited.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Olga Shishkina, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Göttingen (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC

Local Project ID: pr84pu, pr92jo

Turbulent thermal convection is ubiquitous in nature and technical applications. Inclined convection, where a fluid is confined between two differently heated parallel surfaces, which are inclined with respect to gravity, is one of the main model systems to study the physics of turbulent thermal convection. In this project, we focus on the investigation of the interaction between shear and buoyancy and want to know, how they influence the development of the flow superstructures and contribute to the mean heat transport enhancement in the system.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Jonas Wack, Institute of Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machinery, University of Stuttgart (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: HYPERBOL

In the last decades, hydro power plants have experienced a continual extension of the operating range in order to integrate other renewable energy sources into the electrical grid. When operated at off-design conditions, the turbine experiences cavitation which may reduce the power output and can cause severe damage in the machine. Cavitation simulations are necessary to investigate phenomena like the full load instability. The goal of this project is to understand the physical mechanisms that result in an instability at off-design conditions to identify measures that can avoid the occurrence of instability.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Koen Hillewaert, Ariane Frère, Michel Rasquin, Cenaero Research Center (Belgium)

HPC Platform used: JUQUEEN of JSC

Local Project ID: PRA096

Wind turbine and aircraft design relies on numerical simulation. Current aerodynamic models represent turbulence not directly but model its averaged impact. Such models are only reliable near the design point and require vast experience of the design engineer. Industry wants therefore to enable more accurate methods, such as wall-modeled Large-Eddy Simulation (wmLES) which represents turbulent flow structures directly. R2Wall provides a high-resolution simulation of the NACA4412 airfoil as reference data for the development of wall-models for LES and turbulence models in general. This project has enabled the definition of guidelines for future computations, and the calibration of wall-models.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Luca Brandt, Department of Mechanics, KTH, Royal Institute of Technology (Sweden)

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: PP16153682

The focus of this project is the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of an evaporating spray in a turbulent channel flow. The complexity of the phenomenon lies in the nonlinear interaction of phase change thermodynamics and turbulent transport mechanisms at a multitude of scales. The recent availability of larger supercomputing power, together with our novel technique to treat efficiently the interface resolved phase change, enables us to perform the first DNS of more than 14k droplets evaporating in turbulent flow, with full coupling of momentum, heat and mass transfer, both intra- and inter-phase.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Julien Bodart, ISAE-SUPAERO, Université de Toulouse (France)

HPC Platform used: JUQUEEN of JSC

Local Project ID: PRA097

In this study, researchers in fluid mechanics at ISAE-SUPAERO investigate possible control of shock boundary layer interaction, a well known flow phenomenon occuring on high speed supersonic devices. In particular, low frequency modes have a significant impact on the device load. High fidelity simulations of turbulent flows are performed to understand the modifications of the flow field induced by the microramp vortex generators located upstream the interaction.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Markus Klein and Sebastian Ketterl, Institute of Mathematics and Applied Computing, Bundeswehr University Munich

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: pr48no

Primary goal of this project, run on HPC system SuperMUC of LRZ, was the establishing of a direct numerical simulation (DNS) data base of primary breakup of a liquid jet injected into stagnant air. Due to the wide range of time and length scales the development of a predictive large eddy simulation (LES) framework is highly desirable. However, the multiscale nature of atomization is challenging, as the presence of the phase interface causes additional subgrid scale terms to appear in the LES formalism. DNS provides fully resolved flow fields and flow statistics for a-priori subgrid scale analysis and a-posteriori LES validation.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Peter Sanders, Institute of Theoretical Informatics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany)

HPC Platform used: JUQUEEN of JSC

Local Project ID: hka17

Sorting is one of the most fundamental and widely used algorithms. It can be used to build index data structures, e.g., for full text search or for various applications in bioinformatics. Sorting can also rearrange data for further processing. In particular, it is a crucial tool for load balancing in advanced massively simulations. The wide variety of applications means that we need fast sorting algorithms for a wide spectrum of situations. Researchers have developed massively parallel robust sorting algorithms, apply new load balancing techniques, and systematically explore the design space of parallel sorting algorithms.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Hening Bockhorn, Engler-Bunte-Institute/Combustion Technology, Karlruhe Institute of Technology (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: Cnoise

Direct numerical simulation (DNS) has been applied to study the noise emitted by combustion processes. A highly efficient numerical tool based on the public domain code OpenFOAM has first been developed for DNS of chemically reacting flows, including detailed calculations of transport fluxes and chemical reactions. It has then be used to simulate different turbulent flame configurations to gain an insight into the flame-turbulence interaction, which represents the main noise generation mechanisms. Based on the DNS results, simple correlation models have been developed to predict combustion noise by means of unsteady heat release due to turbulent combustion.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Martin Oberlack, Technische Universität Darmstadt (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: pr92la

Channel flows are important references for studying turbulent phenomena in a simplified setting. The present project investigates Couette flow, i.e. channel flow driven by a moving wall. Although important to many practical applications, Couette flows have been studied considerably less than other canonical flows, for (a) the experimental setup is very complex, and (b) long and wide structures are present which are characteristic to Couette-type flows. This accounts for long and wide computational domains, which make direct numerical simulations of Couette flow expensive. Even by applying permeable boundary conditions, i.e. blowing from the lower and suction from the upper wall, the Couette-type structures could not be destroyed. Instead,...

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Lewin Stein, Institut für Strömungsmechanik und Technische Akustik, Technische Universität Berlin (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: AcouTurb

A cavity in a turbulent gas flow often leads to an interaction of vortex structures and acoustics. By exploiting this interaction, in some applications sound can be suppressed: silencers for jet engines or exhausts. In other cases, sound can be equally produced: squealing of open wheel-bays, sunroof and window buffeting, noise of pipeline intersection and tones of wind instruments. Typically, in expansive experimental runs, various configurations are tested in order to fulfill the design objectives of the respective application. Based on a 'Direct Numerical Simulation', the aim is to improve the understanding of the interactions between turbulence and acoustics of cavity resonators and to develop standalone sound prediction models, which...

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Thorsten Lutz, Institute of Aerodynamics and Gas Dynamics, University of Stuttgart (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: pr94va

Researchers of the Institute of Aerodynamics and Gas Dynamics (IAG) at the University of Stuttgart investigate the aerodynamic behaviour of modern wind turbines by means of CFD, using the finite volume code FLOWer. The main topics of interest are the effects on the turbine loads caused by turbulent inflow conditions and their control by active trailing edge flaps, and the analysis of the complex flow around the nacelle. Additional studies are currently conducted regarding the effects of aero-elasticity and impact of complex terrain.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Christian Breitsamter, Chair of Aerodynamics and Fluid Mechanics, Technical University of Munich (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: pr86fi

The project focuses on the one hand on the improvement of flow physics knowledge related to flow separation at highly swept wing leading-edges resulting in large scale vortical structures. The evolution and development of such leading-edge vortices along with inherent instability mechanisms are still hard to be correctly predicted by numerical simulations. Special attention is needed on turbulence modelling and scale resolving techniques enabling also flow control methodologies for such types of flow. On the other hand, aerodynamic features of elasto-flexible lifting surfaces have been studied.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Philipp Neumann, Scientific Computing Group, Universität Hamburg (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: GCS-mddc

The coalescence of nano-droplets is investigated using the highly optimized molecular dynamics software ls1 mardyn. Load balancing of the inhomogeneous vapor-liquid system is achieved through k-d trees, augmented by optimal communication patterns. Several solution strategies that are available to compute molecular trajectories on each process are considered, and the best strategy is automatically selected through an auto-tuning approach. Recent simulations that focused on large-scale homogeneous systems were able to leverage the performance of the entire Hazel Hen supercomputer, simulating for the first time more than twenty trillion molecules at a performance of up to 1.33 Petaflops.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Manuel Keßler, Institut für Aerodynamik und Gasdynamik, Universität Stuttgart (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: HELISIM

Researchers of the Insitute of Aerdynamics and Gasdynamics at the University of Stuttgart leverage high-performance computing to analyse the behaviour of helicopters during various states of flight. Investigations range from deep analyses of fundamental aerodynamic phenomena like dynamic stall on the retreating blade to surveys over a broad spectrum of flight states over the full flight envelope of new configurations, to reduce flight mechanical risks. Recently, the group was able to simulate the first robust representation of the so-called tail-shake phenomenon—an interference between the aerodynamic wake of the rotor and upper fuselage and the tail boom with its elastic behaviour.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Manuel Keßler, Institut für Aerodynamik und Gasdynamik, Universität Stuttgart

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: CARo

Using state-of-the-art simulation technology for highly resolved computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solutions, the helicopter and aeroacoustics group at the Institute of Aerodynamics and Gasdynamics at the University of Stuttgart has simulated the complex aerodynamics, aeromechanics, and aeroacoustics of rotorcraft for years. By advancing the established flow solver FLOWer, which now integrates higher order accuracy and systematic concentration of spatial resolution in targeted regions, the IAG-based group was able to obtain results for complete helicopters at certification-relevant flight states within the variance of individual flight tests for the aerodynamic noise.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Dirk Pflüger, Institute for Parallel and Distributed Systems, University of Stuttgart (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen (HLRS)

Local Project ID: exaHD

The generation of clean, sustainable energy from plasma fusion reactors is currently limited by the presence of microinstabilities that arise during the fusion process, despite international efforts such as the ITER experiment, currently under construction in southern France. Numerical simulations are crucial to understand, predict, and control plasma turbulence with the help of large-scale computations. Due to the high dimensionality of the underlying equations, the fully resolved simulation of the numerical ITER is out of scope with classical discretization schemes, even for the next generation of exascale computers. With five research groups from mathematics, physics, and computer science, the SPPEXA project EXAHD has proposed to use a...

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Eckart Laurien, Institute of Nuclear Energy and Energy Systems (IKE), University of Stuttgart (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: DNSTHTS

In the quest for efficiency enhancement in energy conversion, supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) is an attractive alternative working fluid. However, the heat transfer to sCO2 is much different in the supercritical region than the subcritical region due to the strong variation of thermophysical properties which bring the effects of flow acceleration and buoyancy. The peculiarity in heat transfer and flow characteristics cannot be predicted accurately by using conventional correlations or Reynolds-Averaged Naiver-Stokes (RANS) simulations based on the turbulence models. Therefore, direct numerical simulation (DNS) is used in this ongoing project. In DNS, the Naiver-Stokes equations are numerically solved without any turbulence models. For...

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Sabine Roller, University of Siegen, Institute of Simulation Techniques and Scientific Computing (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC (LRZ)

Local Project ID: pr84xu

This project was part of the ExaFSA project that investigates the possibility to exploit high-performance computing systems for integrated simulations of all parts contributing to noise generation in flows around obstacles. Such computations are challenging, as they involve the interaction of various physical effects on different scales. In this context, the compute time on SuperMUC granted for this project was used to particularly investigate the coupling of the flow within a large acoustic domain with individual discretization methods.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Philipp Gerstner, Engineering Mathematics and Computing Lab (EMCL), Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg (Germany)

HPC Platform used: JUQUEEN (JSC)

Local Project ID: hka14

The dynamic behaviour of fluid motion is driven by processes on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. In a project run by Heidelberg University scientists, parts of model systems that describe fluid dynamics and temperature evolution were investigated. The models are formulated in terms of velocity, temperature, pressure, and density. The researchers employ a hierarchy of different physical models with an increasing degree of complexity. Additionally, uncertain input parameters are taken into account.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Olga Shishkina, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Göttingen (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC (LRZ)

Local Project ID: pr94na

The characteristic patterns seen on the solar surface, on gas giants, in Earth's atmosphere and oceans, and many other geo- and astrophysical settings originate from turbulent convection dynamics flows driven by a density difference caused by, for instance, a temperature gradient. Convection in itself is inherently complex, but often it is the interaction with other forces, such as the Coriolis and Lorentz force due to rotation and magnetic fields, that determines the actual shape and behaviour of the flow structures. Understanding these convective patterns is often essentially tantamount to understanding the underlying physics at play. In this project, surveys through the huge parameter space are conducted, to not only categorise flow...

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Prof. Dr.- Ing. Oskar J. Haidn, TUM Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Munich (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC (LRZ)

Local Project ID: pr83bi

Researchers at the Chair of Turbomachinery and Flight Propulsion (LTF) at the Technical University Munich numerically investigate flow and combustion in rocket engines using “green” propellants. The current focus involves researching methane/oxygen as a propellant combination, promising to be a good replacement for the commonly used hydrazine, offering good performance, storability, and handling qualities, while also being significantly less toxic. The goal of the project is an improved understanding of the relevant physical processes and a reliable prediction of thermal loads on the combustor.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Jörg Schumacher, Technische Universität Ilmenau (Germany)

HPC Platform used: JUQUEEN (JSC)

Local Project ID: hil09

In many turbulent convection flows in nature and technology the thermal diffusivity is much higher than the kinematic viscosity which means that the Prandtl number is very low. Applications of this regime reach from deep solar convection, via convection in the liquid metal core of the Earth to liquid metal batteries for grid energy storage and nuclear engineering technology. Laboratory experiments in low-Prandtl-number convection for Pr < 0.1 have to be conducted in liquid metals which are inaccessible for laser imaging techniques and require analysis by ultrasound or X-rays. Direct numerical simulations of this regime of turbulent convection at high Rayleigh numbers are the only way to reveal the full three-dimensional structure of...

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Peter Gerlinger, Institut für Verbrennungstechnik der Luft- und Raumfahrt, Universität Stuttgart (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: SCRCOMB

At the Institute of Combustion Technology for Aerospace Engineering (IVLR) of the University of Stuttgart a team of scientists numerically investigates reacting flows at conditions typical for modern space transportation systems. The goal of the project is the better understanding of the ongoing processes in the combustion chambers and an improvement of the thermal load predictions. The research is integrated into the program "Technological Foundations for the Design of Thermally and Mechanically Highly Loaded Components of Future Space Transportation Systems" funded by the DFG.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Wolfgang Schröder, Institute of Aerodynamics, RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen (HLRS)

Local Project ID: gcs_jean

A research group from the Institute of Aerodynamics (AIA) of the RWTH Aachen University utilized the computing power of Hazel Hen for large-scale simulations to analyze the intricate wake flow phenomena of space launchers. The objective of the project is the fundamental understanding of the origin of so called buffet loads acting on the nozzle which can lead to critical structural damage and to develop flow control devices to increase the efficiency and reliability of orbital transportation systems necessary for the steadily increasing demand for communication and navigation satellites.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Aman G. Kidanemariam and Markus Uhlmann, Computational Fluid Dynamics group, Institute for Hydrodynamics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Germany

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC (LRZ)

Local Project ID: pr84du

This project has investigated the problem of sediment transport and subaqueous pattern formation by means of high-fidelity direct numerical simulations which resolve all the relevant scales of the flow and the sediment bed. In order to realistically capture the phenomenon, sufficiently large computational domains with up to several billion grid nodes are adopted, while the sediment bed is represented by up to a million mobile spherical particles. The numerical method employed features an immersed boundary technique for the treatment of the moving fluid-solid interfaces and a soft-sphere model to realistically treat the inter-particle contacts. The study provides, first and foremost, a unique set of spatially and temporally resolved...

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: 1) Markus Uhlmann, 2) Marco Mazzuoli, 1) Karlsruhe Institute of Technology/KIT (Germany), 2) University of Genoa (Italy)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC (LRZ)

Local Project ID: pr87yo

Open channel flow can be considered as a convenient "laboratory" for investigating the physics of the flow in rivers. One open questions in this field is related to the influence of a rough boundary (i.e. the sediment bed) upon the hydraulic properties, which to date is still unsatisfactorily modelled by common engineering-type formulae. The present project aims to provide the basis for enhanced models by generating high-fidelity data of shallow flow over a bed roughened with spherical elements in the fully rough regime. In particular, the influence of the roughness Reynolds number and of the spatial roughness arrangement upon the turbulent channel flow structure is being studied.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Torsten Auerswald and Jens Bange, Center for Applied Geoscience, University of Tübingen (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hermit and Hornet of HLRS

Local Project ID: WAF

This project aims at the simulation of the influence of a turbulent atmospheric boundary layer flow on a wing. For this purpose the compressible flow solver DLR-TAU is used, which is developed by the German Aerospace Center (DLR). For initialising the simulation with a turbulent wind field a method to generate synthetic turbulence is used. This method uses statistics from measured time series from the atmospheric boundary layer to generate a threedimensional turbulent wind field which can be used as initial field in the flow simulations.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Thorsten Lutz, Aircraft Aerodynamics Group, Institute of Aerodynamics and Gas Dynamics, University of Stuttgart (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: SCBOPT

In order to significantly reduce the drag and the environmental impact of future aircraft, considerable effort has to be undertaken in all fields of aircraft design. Besides reducing drag around the cruise condition of typical transport aircraft, it is also of great interest to expand the flight envelope in order to allow for a more flexible design. Understanding the behaviour of a commercial transport aircraft at the limits of its flight envelope, away from its design point, requires either expensive flight testing, tests in sophisticated wind tunnel facilities or advanced computational models. As flight tests are very expensive and take place in a late phase during the development of a new aircraft, when most of the design is already...

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Bernhard Weigand, Institute of Aerospace Thermodynamics, University of Stuttgart (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: FS3D

The subject of multiphase flows encompasses many processes in nature and a broad range of engineering applications such as weather forecasting, fuel injection, sprays, and the spreading of substances in agriculture. To investigate these processes the Institute of Aerospace Thermodynamics (ITLR) uses the direct numerical simulation (DNS) in-house code Free Surface 3D (FS3D). The code is continually optimized and expanded with new features and has been in use for more than 20 years. Investigations were performed, for instance, for phase transitions like freezing and evaporation, basic drop and bubble dynamics processes, droplet impacts on a thin film (“splashing”), and primary jet breakup as well as spray simulations, studies involving...

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Claus-Dieter Munz, Institute of Aerodynamics and Gas Dynamics, University of Stuttgart (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: HPCDG

The reduction of aeroacoustic noise emissions from technical systems like wind turbines or airplanes is a today’s key research goal. Understanding the intricate interactions between noise generation and flow field requires the full resolution of all flow features in time and space. Thus, very highly resolved unsteady simulations producing large amounts of data are required to get insight into local noise generation mechanisms and to investigate ideas for reduction. These mechanisms have been investigated by researchers at the University of Stuttgart through direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a generic airfoil configuration on Hazel Hen at HLRS. The results help to understand noise generation from turbulent flows and also serve as a...

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Dr.-Ing. Marcel Pfeiffer (IRS), Prof. Dr.-Ing. Stefanos Fasoulas, Prof. Dr. Claus-Dieter Munz (IAG), University of Stuttgart, (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: IMPD

The Institute of Space Systems (IRS) and the Institute of Aerodynamics and Gas Dynamics (IAG) at the University of Stuttgart cooperatively develop the particle simulation tool "PICLas", a flexible simulation suite for the computation of three-dimensional plasma flows. The tool enables the physically-accurate numerical simulation of non-equilibrium plasma and gas flows. The applications range from the atmospheric entry of spacecraft to laser-plasma interaction in material sciences. The high-fidelity numerical approach allows detailed insights in the physical phenomena and is made feasible by high-performance computing.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Qiaoyan Ye and Oliver Tiedje, Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Engineering and Automation, Stuttgart, (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: droplMP

Researchers carry out numerical simulations of spray painting processes using a commercial high-speed rotary bell atomizer within the frame of an ongoing project “smart spray painting process”. Using a commercial CFD-code, detailed numerical studies deal with the film formation of the paint liquid on the bell cup, the primary liquid breakup near the bell edge, the paint droplet trajectories, as well as the droplet impact onto solid surface. Simulation results deliver important information for understanding and optimization of the complicated spray painting processes.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: P. Karthick Selvam, Institute of Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems (IKE), University of Stuttgart (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: LESHTCF

Understanding the nature of the turbulent flow mixing behavior in power plants which induce thermal fatigue cracking of components is still an unresolved challenge. Aside from measurements being performed at realistic power plant conditions (e.g. at 8 MPa pressure and temperature difference of 240°C between the mixing fluids) numerical calculations involving high-performance computing could throw more light into the complex fluid flow at any location of interest to investigators. Thus a combination of measurements coupled with numerical calculations could positively contribute towards realistic assessment of thermal fatigue damage induced in power plant components.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Michael Gauding, Université de Rouen, Rouen (France)

HPC Platform used: JUQUEEN of JSC

Local Project ID: hfg00

Viscosity represents the most important property of turbulent flows, yet its impact of its variation on turbulence dynamics is not yet fully understood. This project addresses how the dissipation mechanism and self-similarity of turbulent flows are affected by fluctuations in viscosity—questions that can help lead to better turbulent mixing models, and, in turn, improved predictions of pollutants in combustion engines. Highly resolved direct numerical simulations of turbulent shear flows on JUQUEEN with up to 231 billion grid points were performed in pursuit of an answer to this question.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Matthias Meinke, Chair of Fluid Mechanics and Institute of Aerodynamics (AIA), RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: NRoJ

Noise reduction is a key goal in European aircraft policy. One of the major noise sources at aircraft take-off is the engine jet noise. Recently, chevron nozzles were introduced which have drawn a lot of attention in research and the aircraft industry. Since the flow structures in the jet depend on the details of the nozzle exit geometry and have a large impact on the noise sources in the jet, scientists of the RWTH Aachen University extensively investigate chevron nozzles by running large-scale simulations based on a highly resolved mesh with up to 1 billion mesh cells.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Harald Köstler, Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (Germany)

HPC Platform used: JUQUEEN of JSC

Local Project ID: her18

With the rapidly changing massively parallel computer architectures arising in recent years, it became a huge challenge to make efficient use of contemporary supercomputers. Project ExaStencils addresses this problem by providing an easy-to-use, multi-layered domain-specific language to the application programmer such that problems can be formulated in an intuitive way fitting to different levels of abstraction. The necessary code transformations are performed by a special-purpose compiler framework that is able to produce scalable and efficient code that runs on large supercomputers like JUQUEEN of JSC.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Malte Hoffmann, Claus-Dieter Munz, Institute of Aerodynamics and Gas Dynamics, University of Stuttgart (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: hpcHONK

Wind turbines are becoming increasingly efficient and quieter, while turbines operate reliably at high pressures and temperatures, and aircrafts use less fuel. These and other technical advances are made possible in great part because the occurring flow fields can be simulated with great accuracy on modern supercomputers. These machines use one hundred thousand processors and more to perform their calculations. The programs that are to run on such devices must be adapted to this high number of processors. An interdisciplinary team, which includes researchers of several institutes of the University of Stuttgart, has developed such a software package to enable two-phase flow simulations, where gaseous and liquid phases coexist. 

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Jörn Sesterhenn, CFD - Technische Universität Berlin (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hermit/Hornet/Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: ARSI

Supersonic impinging jets can be found in different technical applications of aerospace engineering. Depending on the flow conditions, loud tonal noise can be emitted. The so-called impinging tone is investigated by researchers of the chair of computational fluid dynamics at the Technical University of Berlin. Using direct numerical simulations (DNS) carried out on the Cray HPC systems Hermit, Hornet and Hazel Hen of the HLRS, the underlying sound source mechanisms could be identified for a typical configuration.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Markus J. Kloker, Ulrich Rist, Institute for Aerodynamics and Gas Dynamics, University of Stuttgart (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hornet/Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: LAMTUR

The flow layer near the surface of a body - the boundary layer - can have a smooth, steady, low-momentum laminar state, but also an unsteady, turbulent, layer-stirring state with increased friction drag and wall heat flux. Wall heating is especially severe with supersonic hot gas flows like, e.g., in a rocket (Laval-) nozzle extension. To protect the walls from thermal failure a cooling gas is injected building a cooling film. Its persistence depends strongly on the layer state of the hot-gas flow, the type of cooling gas, and the form and strength of injection. Fundamental studies are performed using direct numerical simulations, providing also valuable benchmark data for less intricate computational-fluid-dynamics methods using turbulence...

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Jörn Sesterhenn, CFD - Technische Universität Berlin (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hermit/Hornet/Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: NOIJ

As part of the collaborative research centre CRC 1029, impingement cooling is studied at the chair of computational fluid dynamics at the Technical University of Berlin. The project aims at a more efficient cooling of turbine blades. This is necessary since future combustion concepts within gas turbines bring much higher thermal loads. Large scale direct numerical simulations (DNS) are carried out using the Cray supercomputers Hermit, Hornet and Hazel Hen of the HLRS.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Tobias Loose, Ingenieurbüro Loose, Wössingen (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: HPC_welding

As an integral part of the PRACE SHAPE project HPC Welding, the parallel solvers of the Finite Element Analysis software LS-DYNA were used by Ingenieurbüro Tobias Loose to perform a welding analysis on HLRS HPC system Hazel Hen. A variety of test cases relevant for industrial applications had been set up with DynaWeld, a welding and heat treatment pre-processor for LS-DYNA, and were run on different numbers of compute cores to test its scaling capabilities.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Apl.-Prof. Dr. P. Gerlinger, Institute of Combustion Technology, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Stuttgart (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: pr87zi

Researchers at the Institute of Combustion Technology at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) use petascale HPC system SuperMUC at LRZ in Munich for the simulation of soot evolution in lifted, turbulent, ethylene-air jet flames. The scope of their work is to develop and analyze simulation techniques for turbulent combustion with focus on soot predictions. The long-term objective is to develop validated high fidelity simulation techniques for soot predictions in turbulent combustion systems such as aeroengines.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: 1) Axel Klawonn, 2) Oliver Rheinbach, 1) Mathematical Institute of the University of Cologne (Germany), 2) Institute of Numerical Analysis and Optimization, Technische Universität Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany)

HPC Platform used: JUQUEEN of JSC

Local Project ID: hfg01

The project EXASTEEL is concerned with parallel implicit solvers for multiscale problems in structural mechanics discretized using finite elements. It is focussed on modern high strength steel materials. The higher strength and better ductility of these materials largely stems from the carefully engineered grain structure at the microscale. The computational simulations used therefore take into account the microstructure, but without resorting to a brute force discretization (which will be out of reach for the foreseeable future). The researchers' approach combines a computational multiscale approach well known in engineering (FE) with state-of-the-art parallel scalable iterative implicit solvers developed in mathematics. 

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Christian Hasse, Numerical Thermo-Fluid Dynamics, Technische Universität Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: pr83xa

The direct numerical simulation performed in the course of this project – run on SuperMUC at LRZ – investigated a temporally evolving non-premixed syngas jet flame. Results of this simulation were used to validate a recently published set of extended model equations for the reaction zone dynamics in non-premixed combustion. Furthermore, the dataset was used to analyze the importance of curvature induced transport phenomena. Regions could be identified where curvature has a significant impact on the flame structure.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Michael Breuer, Department of Fluid Mechanics, Helmut-Schmidt-University, Hamburg (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: pr84na

The interaction between a turbulent flow field and light-weight structural systems is the main topic of the present research project aiming at the development of advanced computational methodologies for this kind of multi-physics problem denoted fluid-structure interaction (FSI). This should allow to predict these complex coupled problems more reliably and to get closer to reality. An original computational methodology based on advanced techniques on the fluid and the structure side has been developed especially for thin flexible structures in turbulent flows.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Dominique Thévenin, Lab. of Fluid Dynamics and Technical Flows, University of Magdeburg "Otto von Guericke", Magdeburg (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: pr84qo

Spray evaporation and burning in a turbulent environment is a configuration found in many practical applications, such as diesel engines, direct-injection gasoline engines, gas turbines, etc. Understanding the physical process involved in this combustion process will help improving the combustion efficiency of these devices and, therefore, reduce their emissions. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is a very attractive tool to investigate in all details the underlying processes since it is able to capture and resolve all scales in the system. In this project, evaporation, ignition, and mixing are investigated in both temporally- and spatially-evolving jets, using DNS.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Jörg Schumacher, Technische Universität Ilmenau (Germany)

HPC Platform used: JUQUEEN of JSC

Local Project ID: hil09

In many turbulent convection flows in nature and technology the thermal diffusivity is much higher than the kinematic viscosity which means that the Prandtl number is very low. Laboratory experiments in very low-Prandtl-number convection have to be conducted in liquid metals which are inaccessible for laser imaging techniques and require analysis by ultrasound or X-rays. Researchers of the TU Ilmenau and the Occidental College Los Angeles ran direct numerical simulations of this regime of turbulent convection at high Rayleigh numbers to reveal the full 3D structure of temperature and velocity fields.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Sabine Roller, University of Siegen, Institute of Simulation Techniques and Scientific Computing (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: PP14112730

The electro-dialysis process is an efficient desalination technique that uses ion exchange membranes to produce clean water from seawater. This process involves different physical phenomena like fluid dynamics, electrodynamics and diffusive mass-transport along with their interactions. Rigorous assessment of those interactions, especially those near the membranes, are only possible through large-scale coupled simulations. The aim of the APAM compute time project is the detailed flow simulation in this application to understand the effect of different spacer structures between the membranes in this process.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Christian Hasse, Numerical Thermo-Fluid Dynamics, Technische Universität Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hornet of HLRS

Local Project ID: ICECCV

A numerical research project, run on Hornet of HLRS, focused on the grid of internal combustion (IC) engines in the vicinity of the intake valve and its effect on the simulation results. The overall goal was to develop a methodology for a quantitative comparison of different results in terms of the intake jet as well as the identification of crucial mesh regions.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Jonas Wack, Institute of Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machinery, University of Stuttgart (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: hyperbol

In the last decades, hydraulic machines have experienced a continual extension of the operating range in order to integrate other renewable energy sources into the electrical grid. When operated at off-design conditions, the turbine experiences cavitation which may reduce the power output and can cause severe damage in the machine. Cavitation simulations are suitable to give a better understanding of the physical processes acting at off-design conditions. The goal of this project is to give an insight in the capabilities of two-phase simulations for hydraulic machines and determine the range for safe operation.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Bernd Junginger, Institute of Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machinery, University of Stuttgart (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: axialgap

The operation range of hydraulic turbines is increasing more and more to guarantee the power system stability of the electric grid due to the increased amount of electric power generated by unregulated renewable energy like wind and photovoltaic. Therefore, hydraulic turbines are operated in off-design conditions where highly transient phenomena can occur. Standard approaches which are used for the design process of hydraulic machines are no longer suitable to predict the correct flow field in these operating points. Advanced turbulence models and high mesh resolutions are applied to increase the accuracy of the simulations.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Bernd Budich, Technische Universität München (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: pr85ki

A project carried out by a team of scientists from the Institute of Aerodynamics and Fluid Mechanics at the Technische Universität München focused on the numerical investigation of cavitating flow in the context of ship propellers. A key aspect of this project was to develop the ability to assess local flow aggressiveness and to quantify the potential of material erosion.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Detlef Lohse, University of Twente (The Netherlands)

HPC Platform used: Hermit of HLRS

Local Project ID: PP12061135

Rayleigh-Benard flow (the flow in a box heated from below and cooled from above) and Taylor-Couette flow (the flow between two counter-rotating cylinders) are the two paradigmatic systems in the physics of fluids, and many new concepts have been tested with them. Researchers from the Physics of Fluids group at the University of Twente have been carrying out simulations of these systems on HLRS supercomputers to try and improve our understanding of turbulence.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Walter Boscheri, Department of Civil, Environmental and Mechanical Engineering, University of Trento (Italy)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: stimulus

Researchers leveraged the computing power of SuperMUC for the development of finite volume Lagrangian numerical schemes on multidimensional unstructured meshes for fluid dynamic problems. The numerical algorithms developed in project STiMulUs are designed to be high order accurate in space as well as in time, requiring even more information to be updated and recomputed continuously as the simulation goes on.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Manuel Keßler, Institut für Aerodynamik und Gasdynamik, Universität Stuttgart (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hornet and Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: DGDES

Despite the great success of current state-of-the-art fluid flow solvers, the continuing development of computing hardware necessitates new numerical methods for flow simulations. High order methods on unstructured grids like Discontinuous Galerkin discretisations deliver highly accurate results and allow for unprecedented parallelisation efficiency at huge numbers of cores. The project aims to transfer the infrastructure technology (overlapping Chimera grids, mesh movement and deformation, convergence acceleration) from conventional to such advanced solvers to allow application to relevant engineering problems like helicopter simulations in the mid-term future.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Manuel Keßler, Institut für Aerodynamik und Gasdynamik (IAG), Universität Stuttgart (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: HELISIM

The helicopter and aeroacoustics group of IAG runs extensive aerodynamics and aeromechanics simulations of rotorcraft in order to understand not only basic parameters as power requirements or loads on the rotor blades but also to predict acoustic footprints and gain a deeper insight into the interactions between different helicopter components. For this purpose, the group runs simulation setups on HLRS supercomputer Hazel Hen of a magnitude beyond 200 million cells with fifth order accuracy and even up to half a billion cells for selected cases, delivering results directly comparable to real flight test data at unparalleled accuracy.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Erol Oezger, Technische Hochschule Ingolstadt (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hermit and Hornet of HLRS

Local Project ID: DWLBM

The project Investigation of Delta Wing Time Dependent Flow Characteristics with Lattice-Boltzmann Method is carried out by the Technische Hochschule Ingolstadt, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, at the High Performance Computing Center Stuttgart. It focuses on the numerical investigation of the delta wing flow under various aspects such as sweep angle variation, sharp or round leading edges, as well as high and lower Reynolds numbers with a Lattice-Boltzmann PowerFLOW solver provided by Exa.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Javier Jiménez, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (Spain)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

An international research project aimed at investigating the structure and dynamics of wall-bounded turbulence in adverse pressure gradient environments has resulted in the first Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of a self-similar turbulent boundary layers (TBL) in a strong adverse pressure gradient (APG) environment at the verge of separation up to a Reynolds number based on the momentum thickness of 104.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Markus Uhlmann, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: pr83la

Turbulent flow seeded with solid particles is encountered in a number of natural and man-made systems. Many physical effects occurring when the fluid and the solid phase interact strongly so far have obstinately resisted analytical and experimental approaches – sometimes with far reaching consequences in various practical applications. Using SuperMUC, researchers simulated with unprecedented detail the turbulent flow in an unbounded domain in the presence of suspended, heavy, solid particles in order to understand and describe the dynamics of such particulate flow systems with sufficient accuracy.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Markus Uhlmann, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hornet of HLRS

Local Project ID: DNSDUCT

Researchers investigated the mechanism of secondary flow formation in open duct flow where rigid/rigid and mixed (rigid/free-surface) corners exist. Employing direct numerical simulations (DNS) on HLRS high performance computing system Hornet, the scientists aimed at generating high-fidelity data in closed and open duct flows by means of pseudo-spectral DNS and at analysing the flow fields with particular emphasis on the dynamics of coherent structures.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Petros Koumoutsakos, Computational Science & Engineering Laboratory, ETH Zurich (Switzerland)

HPC Platform used: JUQUEEN of JSC

Leveraging the petascale computing power of HPC system JUQUEEN of the Jülich Supercomputing Centre, researchers at the Chair of Computational Science at ETH Zurich performed unprecedented large-scale simulations of cloud cavitation collapse with up to 75’000 vapor cavities on resolutions of up to 0.5 trillion mesh cells and 25’000 time steps.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Christoph Scheit, Lehrstuhl für Prozessmaschinen und Anlagentechnik, Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: pr86xe

In order to gain a deeper understanding of the aerodynamic noise generation mechanisms and transmission for automotive applications, researchers from the Universität Erlangen leveraged HPC system SuperMUC of LRZ to develop a hybrid aeroacoustic method. The turbulent flow over a forward-facing step served as a test case for the final validation of a hybrid scheme for the computation of broadband noise, as caused typically by turbulent flows.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Stefan Hickel, Technische Universität München (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: pr45tu

Researchers of the Technische Universität München conducted large-eddy simulations (LES) on HPC system SuperMUC of LRZ for numerical investigations of a pseudo-shock system. These pseudo-shock systems influence the reliability and performance of a wide range of flow devices, such as ducts and pipelines in the field of process engineering and supersonic aircraft inlets. Thus, the optimization of pseudo-shock systems is of great academic and commercial interest.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Jörn Sesterhenn, CFD - Technische Universität Berlin (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hermit of HLRS

Local Project ID: SBLI-SS

Shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions (SBLIs) play an important part in many engineering applications. They are common in internal and external aerodynamic flows. However, numerical treatment of such SBLIs is difficult as the important flow features place competing demands on the applied numerical algorithms. Using the HPC infrastructure provided by the HLRS, scientists of the Technische Universität Berlin performed a detailed direct numerical simulation of a transonic SBLI creating a detailed numerical database this way which is now available for further detailed studies.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Wolfgang Schröder, Institute of Aerodynamics, RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: gcs-jean

Within the framework of a research project which aims at reducing the emission of CO2 by conventional coal-fired power plants through oxy-fuel combustion, scientists of the RWTH Aachen University simulated the heating processes of coal dust in order to gain a better understanding of the conditions causing carbon dust to ignite in an oxygen-carbon dioxide atmosphere. Since carbon particles are of irregular, non-spherical shape their motion is difficult to predict, thus simulations of large quantities of fully dissolved carbon particles moving freely in a turbulent flow require the availability of petascale HPC systems like Hazel Hen.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Michael Breuer, Department of Fluid Mechanics, Helmut-Schmidt-University, Hamburg (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: pr47me

Fluid-Structure Interaction is a topic of major interest in many engineering fields. The significant growth of the computational capabilities allows solving more complex coupled problems, whereby the physical models get closer to reality. In order to simulate practically relevant light-weight structural systems in turbulent flows, scientists of the Helmut-Schmidt-University in Hamburg developed and implemented an original computational methodology especially for thin flexible structures in turbulent flows.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Dr. Sylvain Reboux, ASCOMP AG, Zurich/Switzerland

HPC Platform used: Hermit of HLRS

Local Project ID: PP13081602

This project, for which HPC system Hermit of the High Performance Computing Center Stuttgart served as computing platform, is part of the NURESAFE initiative for nuclear safety. The objective was to develop a global modelling framework for multi-scale core thermal-hydraulics in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) as understanding heat transfer phenomena in turbulent bubbly flows is of great interest for the scientist community and for the industry.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Claus-Dieter Munz, Institut für Aerodynamik und Gasdynamik, Universität Stuttgart (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hornet of HLRS

Local Project ID: HPCDG

In order to analyse aeroacoustic noise generation processes, researchers from the Institute for Aerodynamics and Gas Dynamics performed high fidelity, large-scale flow and acoustic computations using the discontinuous Galerkin spectral element method on the HPC system Hornet at the High Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS). The aim of this investigation is to gain insight into the tonal noise generation process of a side-view mirror.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Stefan Hickel, Technische Universität München (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hermit of HLRS

Local Project ID: CMHF

A scramjet is an air breathing jet engine for hypersonic flight velocities of about ten to twenty times the speed of sound. Combustion, too, takes place at supersonic flow velocity, which requires a fast mixing of fuel and compressed airflow to enable combustion during the very short residence time of the reactants in the combustion chamber. To analyze the flame stabilization in the combustion chamber through a pilot injection of hydrogen and air at the base of the strut injector, researchers from the Technische Universität München (TUM) performed large-eddy simulations for a generic strut-injector geometry based on an experimental setup at the TUM.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Harald Köstler, Lehrstuhl Informatik 10 (Systemsimulation), Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: pr86ma

Researchers of the University of Erlangen applied the waLBerla Framework, a widely applicable lattice Boltzmann simulation code, on HPC system SuperMUC of LRZ to test the suitability of the software framework for different Computational Fluid Dynamics applications: One project focused on investigating collective swarming behavior of numerous self-propelled microorganisms at low Reynolds numbers, a second project implemented within waLBerla was the simulation of electron beam melting, while a third simulated the separation of charged macromolecules in electrolyte solutions inside channels of dimensions relevant for lab-on-a-chip (LoC) systems.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Francesco Grasso, Institut Aérotechnique, Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers, Saint-Cyr-l'Ecole (France)

HPC Platform used: JUQUEEN of JSC

Local Project ID: PRA084

Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent mixing layers has been possible only in relatively recent times. In an ambitious project using HPC system JUQUEEN of JSC, scientists analysed the process of mixing layer formation in a flow configuration with sizeable compressibility effects by numerically reproducing the flow conditions of a well documented flow case with two turbulent streams. Large-scale direct numerical simulation were performed in a wide computational domain which included the two upstream turbulent boundary layers developing on the two sides of a zero-thickness splitter plate and their early merging region. The complexity of the flow, the extent of the computational box and the mesh size made the study extremely...

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Claus-Dieter Munz, Institute of Aerodynamics and Gas Dynamics, University of Stuttgart

HPC Platform used: Hornet of HLRS

Local Project ID: XXL_lamtur

Scientists of the Institute of Aerodynamics and Gas Dynamics of the University of Stuttgart conducted a Direct Numerical Simulation of a spatially-developing supersonic turbulent boundary layer up to ReΘ=3878. For this purpose, they used the discontinuous Galerkin spectral element method (DGSEM), a very efficient DG formulation that is specifically tailored to HPC applications. It allowed the researchers to efficiently exploit the entire computational power available on the HLRS Cray XC40 supercomputer Hornet and to run the simulation with 93,840 processors without any performance losses. 

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Wolfgang Schröder, Institute of Aerodynamics, RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hornet of HLRS

Local Project ID: XXL_Jean

A research team of the Institute of Aerodynamics (AIA) of the RWTH Aachen University leveraged the petascale computing power of the HPC system Hornet for large-scale simulation runs which used the entirety of the system’s available 94,646 compute cores. The project “Large-Eddy Simulation of a Helicopter Engine Jet” aimed at analysing the impact of internal perturbations due to geometric variations on the flow field and the acoustic field of a helicopter engine jet. For this purpose, the researchers conducted highly resolved large-eddy simulations based on hierarchically refined Cartesian meshes up to 1 billion cells over a time span of 300 hours.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Wolfgang Schröder, Institute of Aerodynamics, RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hornet of HLRS

Local Project ID: XXL_jean

Exploiting the available computing capacities of supercomputer Hornet of the High Performance Computing Center Stuttgart, researchers from the Institute of Aerodynamics (AIA) of the RWTH Aachen University conducted a large-scale simulation run in their efforts to tackle the prediction of the acoustic field of a low pressure axial fan using computational aeroacoustics (CAA) methods. Goal of this project, which scaled to 92,000 compute cores of the HPC system Hornet, was to achieve a better understanding of the development of vortical flow structures and the turbulence intensity in the tip-gap of a ducted axial fan.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Sabine Roller, University of Siegen, Institute of Simulation Techniques and Scientific Computing

HPC Platform used: Hornet of HLRS

Local Project ID: XXL_ITCD

A research team of the Institute of Simulation Techniques and Scientific Computing of the University of Siegen leveraged the petascale computing power of HPC system Hornet for their research project Ion Transport by Convection and Diffusion. This large-scale simulation project stressed the available capacities of the HLRS supercomputer to its full extent as the simulation involved the simultaneous consideration of multiple effects like flow through a complex geometry, mass transport due to diffusion and electrodynamic forces. Goal of this project was to achieve a better understanding of the electrodialysis desalination process in order to identify methods and possibilities of how to optimize it.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Markus Uhlmann, Institute for Hydromechanics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology/KIT (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: pr58cu

A research project addressed the fundamental mechanisms and processes involved in the dynamics of a large number of rigid particles settling under the influence of gravity in an initially quiescent fluid, as well the characteristics of the particle-induced flow field.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Daniela Gisele François, Institut für Strömungsmechanik, TU Braunschweig (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hermit of HLRS

Local Project ID: NSESRSM

One of the major limiting factors of the flight operational range of transport aircraft is the inlet separation of engine. The overall aim of this project is to provide an efficient numerical method able to compute the large range of spectral scales present in flows during the separation process.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Christian Breitsamter, AER/TU München (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: pr86fi

For delta and diamond wing configurations, the flow field is typically dominated by large scale vortex structures, which originate from the wing leading-edges. With increasing angle of attack, the flow structures grow in size and become more and more unsteady. By use of active and passive flow control mechanisms, the vortex characteristics can be manipulated and controlled in some extent.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Mauro Sbragaglia, University of Roma (Italy)

HPC Platform used: Hermit of HLRS

Local Project ID: PP13081531

Scientists of the University of Rome (“Tor Vergata”) and the University of Eindhoven aimed to perform a systematic investigation of multi-component and/or multi-phase flow dynamics in porous matrices adopting a bottom-up, multi-scale approach based on a Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM).

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Manfred Krafczyk, IRMB/TU Braunschweig (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hermit of HLRS

Local Project ID: PS-LBM

Scientists of the Technische Universität Braunschweig conduct Direct Navier-Stokes (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) computations of turbulent flows which explicitly take into account specific pore scale geometries obtained from computer tomography imaging and do not use any explicit turbulence modeling.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Richard Jefferson-Loveday, The University of Nottingham (U.K.)

HPC Platform used: Hermit of HLRS

Local Project ID: PP13081626

With the projected demand for air transport set to double the world aircraft fleet by 2020 it is becoming urgent to take steps to reduce the environmental impact of take-off noise from aircraft. Scientists from the UK performed highly intensive Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of complex geometry jets with the major emphasis to use the LES CFD approach (Computational Fluid Dynamics) to enable improved prediction and to generate the necessary complex unsteady flow fields needed for acoustic modelling.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Christian Egerer, AER/TU München (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC (LRZ) / Hornet/Hermit (HLRS)

Local Project ID: LRZ Project ID: pr86ta / HLRS Project ID: LESCAV

Modern Diesel injection systems exceed injection pressures of 2000 bar in order to meet current and future emission regulations. By accelerating the flow through an injection nozzle or throttle valve pressure in the liquid can drop below vapor pressure, initiating local evaporation (hydrodynamic cavitation). The advection of vapor cavities into regions where the static pressure of the surrounding liquid exceeds vapor pressure leads to a sudden re-condensation or collapse of vapor cavities. The surrounding liquid is accelerated towards the center of the cavities and strong shock waves are emitted. The resulting pressure loads can lead to material erosion. For optimization of future fuel injectors the ability to predict cavitation and...

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Jörg Schumacher, TU Ilmenau (Germany)

HPC Platform used: JUQUEEN of JSC

Local Project ID: hil07

An international team of scientists conducted high-precision spectral element simulations which resolved the fine-scale structure of turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection, in particular the statistical fluctuations of the temperature and velocity gradients.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Marc Ellero, Technische Universität München (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: MMPS

A team of scientists from Germany, UK, US and Spain have developed a multiscale particle methods framework based on Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) and the stochastic Smoothed Dissipative Particle Dynamics (SDPD) to simulate the complex dynamics of submicron-sized colloidal and large non-colloidal particles suspended in Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids.