COMPUTATIONAL AND SCIENTIFIC ENGINEERING

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Markus Uhlmann , Institute for Hydromechanics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT)

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen and Hawk of HLRS

Local Project ID: GCS-PASC

The quality of surface water typically depends upon a complex interplay between physical, chemical and biological factors which are far from being completely understood. Most practical water quality predictions for rivers or streams rely on various simplifications esp. with regards to the turbulent flow conditions. This project aims at pushing the modeling boundary further by performing massively-parallel computer simulations which resolve all scales of hydrodynamic turbulence in river-like flows, the micro-scale flow around rigid, mobile particles, and the concentration field of suspended bacteria. The data obtained helps quantifying the shortcomings of simpler currently used prediction models and will contribute to their improvement.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Manuel Keßler , Institute of Aerodynamics and Gasdynamics, University of Stuttgart

HPC Platform used: Hazeln Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: GCS-CARo

Helicopters and other rotorcraft like future air taxis generate substantial sound, placing a noise burden on the community. Advanced simulation capabilities developed at IAG over the last decades enable the prediction of aeroacoustics together with aerodynamics and performance, and thus allow an accurate and reliable assessment of different concepts long before first flight. Consequently, this technology serves to identify promising radical configurations initially as well as to further optimize designs decided on at later stages of the development process. Conventional helicopters may benefit from these tools as much as breakthrough layouts in the highly dynamic Urban Air Mobility sector.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Dr. Manuel Keßler , Institute of Aerodynamics and Gas Dynamics, University of Stuttgart

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen and Hawk of HLRS

Local Project ID: GCSHELISIM

The helicopters & aeroacoustics group of the Institute of Aerodynamics and Gas Dynamics at the University of Stuttgart continues to develop their well-established and validated rotorcraft simulation framework. Vibration prediction and noise reduction are currently the focus of research, and progress into manoeuvre flight situations is on the way. For two decades, high-performance computing leverged within the HELISIM project has enabled improvements for conventional helicopters as much as for the upcoming eVTOLs, commonly known as air taxis, in terms of performance, comfort, and efficiency. Community acceptance will be fostered via noise reduction and safety enhancements, made possible by this research project.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Jörg Schumacher , Technische Universität Ilmenau

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC and SuperMUC-NG of LRZ

Local Project ID: pr62se, pn68ni

Turbulent convection is one essential process to transport heat in fluid flows. In many of the astrophysical or technological applications of convection the working fluid is characterized by a very low dimensionless Prandtl number which relates the kinematic viscosity of the fluid to its temperature diffusivity. Two important cases are turbulent convection in the Sun and turbulent heat transfer in the cooling blankets of nuclear fusion reactors. Massively parallel simulations of the simplest setting of a turbulent convection flow, Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a layer or a straight duct that is uniformly heated from below and cooled from above, help to understand the basic heat transfer mechanisms that these applications have in common.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Matthias Meinke , Chair of Fluid Mechanics and Institute of Aerodynamics, RWTH Aachen University

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen and Hawk (HLRS), JUQUEEN (JSC)

Local Project ID: GCS-Aflo (HLRS), chac32 (JSC)

A new active surface actuation technique to reduce the friction drag of turbulent boundary layers is applied to the flow around an aircraft wing section. Through the interaction of the transversal traveling surface wave with the turbulent flow structures, the skin-friction on the surface can be considerably reduced. Highly-resolved large-eddy simulations are conducted to investigate the influence of the surface actuation technique on the turbulent flow field around an airfoil at subsonic flow conditions. The active technique, which previously was only tested in generic scenarios, achieves a considerable decrease of the airfoil drag.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Ulrich Rist, Markus Kloker, Christoph Wenzel , Institute of Aerodynamics and Gas Dynamics, University of Stuttgart

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen and Hawk of HLRS

Local Project ID: GCS-Lamt

This project explores laminar-turbulent transition, turbulence, and flow control in boundary layers at various flow speeds from the subsonic to the hypersonic regime. The physical problems under investigation deal with prediction of laminar-turbulent transition on airfoils for aircraft, prediction of critical roughness heights in laminar boundary layers, turbulent drag reduction, the origins of turbulent superstructures in turbulent flows, the use of roughness patterns for flow control, effusion cooling in laminar and turbulent supersonic boundary-layer flow, DNS of disturbance receptivity on a swept wing at high Reynolds numbers, and plasma actuator design for active control of disturbances in a swept-wing flow.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Wolfgang Schröder , Institute of Aerodynamics, RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen of HLRS and JUQUEEN of JSC

Local Project ID: GCS-SOPF (HLRS) and hac31 (JSC)

Researchers of the Institute of Aerodynamics (AIA) at RWTH Aachen University conducted large-scale benchmark simulations on supercomputer Hazel Hen of the High-Performance Computing Center Stuttgart to analyze the interaction of non-spherical particles with turbulent flows. These simulations provide a unique data base for the development of simple models which can be applied to study complex engineering problems. Such models are required in a larger research framework to improve the efficiency of pulverized coal and biomass combustion to significantly reduce the CO2 emissions.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Heinz Pitsch , Institute for Combustion Technology, RWTH Aachen University, Germany

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: GCS-mres

In order to support sustainable powertrain concepts, synthetic fuels show significant potential to be a promising solution for future mobility. It was found that the formation of soot and CO2 emissions during the energy transformation process of synthetic fuels can be reduced compared to conventional fuels and that sustainable fuel production pathways exists. Simulations of these multiphase, reactive systems are needed to fully unlock the potential of new powertrain concepts. Due to the large separation of scales, these simulations are only possible with current supercomputers.