COMPUTATIONAL AND SCIENTIFIC ENGINEERING

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Sahin Yigit, Josef Hasslberger, Markus Klein , Numerical Methods in Aerospace Engineering, Bundeswehr University Munich

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC and SuperMUC-NG of LRZ

Local Project ID: pn56di

This project focuses on the modelling and physical understanding of 3D turbulent natural convection of non-Newtonian fluids in enclosures. This topic has wide relevance in engineering applications such as preservation of canned foods, polymer and chemical processing, bio-chemical synthesis, solar and nuclear energy, thermal energy storages. Different aspects of non-Newtonian fluids have been analysed in the course of this work: The behaviour of yield stress fluids in cubical enclosures, 2D and 3D Rayleigh-Bénard convection of power-law fluids in cylindrical and annular enclosures and finally the investigation of Prandtl number (Pr) effects near active walls on the velocity gradient and flow topologies.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Univ.-Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Michael Breuer , Department of Fluid Mechanics, Helmut-Schmidt-University, Hamburg (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: pr53ne

The interaction between fluids and structures (fluid structure interaction/FSI) is a topic of interest in many science fields. In addition to experimental investigations, numerical simulations have become a valuable tool to foresee complex flow phenomena such as vortex shedding, transition and separation or critical stresses in the structure exposed to the flow. In civil engineering, e.g., structures are exposed to strong variations of the wind, particularly wind gusts, and such high loads can ultimately lead to a complete destruction of the structure. Scientists are leveraging HPC technologies in order to model wind gusts and to comprehend their impact on the FSI phenomenon.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Markus Klein and Sebastian Ketterl , Institute of Mathematics and Applied Computing, Bundeswehr University Munich

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: pr48no

Primary goal of this project, run on HPC system SuperMUC of LRZ, was the establishing of a direct numerical simulation (DNS) data base of primary breakup of a liquid jet injected into stagnant air. Due to the wide range of time and length scales the development of a predictive large eddy simulation (LES) framework is highly desirable. However, the multiscale nature of atomization is challenging, as the presence of the phase interface causes additional subgrid scale terms to appear in the LES formalism. DNS provides fully resolved flow fields and flow statistics for a-priori subgrid scale analysis and a-posteriori LES validation.