COMPUTATIONAL AND SCIENTIFIC ENGINEERING

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Harald Klimach , Simulation Techniques and Scientific Computing, University of Siegen

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: pr62cu

This project looked into various strategies to couple domains of distinct physical and numerical properties to tackle direct aero-acoustic simulations. A turbulent flow around an airfoil and the emitted sound waves in a large area of interest was simulated. Different physical effects can be observed in spatially separated domains and the appropriate equation systems are solved in each one using the best fitting numerical discretization. The main focus of the project was the evaluation of different coupling methods to enable this partitioned simulation on massively parallel systems.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Sabine Roller , University of Siegen, Institute of Simulation Techniques and Scientific Computing (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC (LRZ)

Local Project ID: pr84xu

This project was part of the ExaFSA project that investigates the possibility to exploit high-performance computing systems for integrated simulations of all parts contributing to noise generation in flows around obstacles. Such computations are challenging, as they involve the interaction of various physical effects on different scales. In this context, the compute time on SuperMUC granted for this project was used to particularly investigate the coupling of the flow within a large acoustic domain with individual discretization methods.

Computational and Scientific Engineering

Principal Investigator: Sabine Roller , University of Siegen, Institute of Simulation Techniques and Scientific Computing (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: PP14112730

The electro-dialysis process is an efficient desalination technique that uses ion exchange membranes to produce clean water from seawater. This process involves different physical phenomena like fluid dynamics, electrodynamics and diffusive mass-transport along with their interactions. Rigorous assessment of those interactions, especially those near the membranes, are only possible through large-scale coupled simulations. The aim of the APAM compute time project is the detailed flow simulation in this application to understand the effect of different spacer structures between the membranes in this process.