NEWSFLASHES

With the 26th Call for Large-Scale Projects, the Gauss Centre for Supercomputing (GCS) allocated roughly 1.4 billion computing core hours to challenging national research projects requiring the support of high-performance computing (HPC) technology. In total, the GCS scientific steering granted 15 project access to Germany’s three national HPC centres.

Due to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic, the International Supercomputing Conference (ISC) will again be held in digital format only. The event will take place from June 24 to July 2, and the Gauss Centre for Supercomputing (GCS) will be there with a dedicated website and a virtual booth.

Week-long digital event provides opportunities for networking and presentations on the future of European HPC.

Germany’s leading HPC centres collectively provide roughly 130 petaflops of performance, and the Jülich Supercomputing Centre’s Booster module for JUWELS leads to a top 3 ranking in the Green500 list.

The three leading German HPC facilities have different approaches to tackling the issue of sustainable supercomputing, but all centres are dedicated to environmental stewardship.

Despite having had only modest plans for online training courses in 2020, COVID-19 demanded that GCS centres’ training staffs evolve to ensure the organization delivered on one of its core missions—training scientists to make the best use of HPC resources.

Scientists pursuing research aimed at prevention, containment, remediation, or cures related to the coronavirus pandemic will be given expedited access to HPC resources at the Gauss Centre for Supercomputing.

As the first major supercomputing center in all of Europe, GCS member High-Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS) has received certification under the Eco-Management and Audit Scheme (EMAS). The accomplishment is the culmination of a multiyear effort to create and implement a comprehensive sustainability concept that guides HLRS's operation and will help shape its future growth.

HLRS, JSC, and LRZ staff collaborate to transfer files efficiently around the world in conjunction with the annual SC Asia conference.

Arrival of a new 26-petaflop high-performance computing system marks the beginning of a new era for advanced computational research in Stuttgart.

Stuttgart-based Gauss centre certified under the ISO 14001 norm and ISO 50001 framework.

Long-time GCS collaborator and user Prof. Dr. Ulrich Rüde discusses his views on the future of supercomputing.

With the 22nd GCS Large-Scale Call, the Gauss Centre for Supercomputing (GCS) scientific steering committee approved the allocation of 703 million core hours of computing time to eleven scientifically outstanding German research projects relying on the support of petascale-performance high-performance computing (HPC) technology.

Meet the three GCS centres, the High-Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS), Jülich Supercomputing Centre (JSC), and Leibniz Supercomputing Centre Garching (LRZ) at SC19 in Denver, Colorado (USA). The international conference for high-performance computing, networking, storage, and analysis, this year held from Nov. 17–22, 2019 at the Colorado Convention Center, is the annually recurring premier event for the global high-performance computing (HPC) community.

From sponsoring students and awards, to speaking and moderating discussions, to hosting guests at its “HPC Happy Hour,” GCS and centres’ staffs were heavily involved in this year’s International Supercomputing Conference.

The record-breaking galaxy formation simulation, Illustris, which ran on the GCS HPC systems SuperMUC of LRZ and Hazel Hen of HLRS, can now adorn letters across the globe on a newly released postage stamp. The research projects of a multi-institution team were led by researchers at the Heidelberg Institute of Theoretical Studies (HITS) who are long-time users of GCS HPC ressources.

The High-Performance Computing Center of the University of Stuttgart (HLRS) and Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) announced a joint collaboration to build a next-generation supercomputer. The new HPC system Hawk will be 3.5 times faster than HLRS’ current flagship HPC system Hazel Hen.

GCS mourns the loss of Professor Dr.-Ing. Siegfried Wagner, founding member of the Gauss Centre for Supercomputing (GCS) and former Chairman of the GCS Scientific Steering Committee. Professor Wagner was a tireless advocate of high-performance computing (HPC) and its value to scientific engineering. He served as head of the Institute of Aerodynamics and Gas Dynamics of the University of Stuttgart from 1991 until 2004. 

A two-day workshop at the High-Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS) brought together infrastructure experts from German supercomputing centers to discuss strategies for building more sustainable systems.

The three GCS centres HLRS (High Performance Computing Center Stuttgart), JSC (Jülich Supercomputing Centre) and LRZ (Leibniz Supercomputing Centre, Garching near Munich) are working to implement better network tools and cooperation.

The three GCS centres HLRS, JSC, and LRZ are participating in this year's Supercomputing Conference (SC17) from November 12 -17, in Denver, Colorado (USA).

The Gauss Centre for Supercomputing has been a unified force for ten years, combining the strength of Germany's three HPC centers to support leading edge computing research. A recent feature was published that highlights the past, present and future of GCS.

The German federal ministry praised GCS's accomplishments and announced newly increased support for supercomputing. The primary focus will be on improving power, efficiency, and training as computing moves toward exascale.

Prof. Dr. Johanna Wanka, Federal Minister for Education and Research, was one of many who visited HLRS's booth at this year's CeBIT to learn more about AR technology and the benefits of high-performance computing.

The new training center of the High Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS) opened on March 7. The 2,003 sqm complex will now provide excellent facilities for the various types of HPC and IT trainings offered by HLRS.

Meet the High Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS) at CeBIT 2017 in Hannover (March 20-24). Representatives of the HRLS visualization department will demonstrate how HPC plays an essential role in vehicle development and safety research.

The new supercomputing world record was set by scaling ANSYS Fluent to more than 170,000 computer cores on the GCS high performance computing (HPC) system Hazel Hen hosted at HLRS.

An international team of researchers achieved a major break-through in the ongoing quest to profile dark matter. The spectacular findings were given additional honour by the Editorial Board of NATURE Magazine, where they were published on November 2.

The three member centres of the Gauss Centre for Supercomputing will present their research activities in the field of High Performance Computing (HPC) in their respective booths at this year's Supercomputing Conference (SC16), held Nov. 13-18 in Salt Lake City, USA.