RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS

Our research highlights serve as a collection of feature articles detailing recent scientific achievements on GCS HPC resources. 

With the help of new observational data of gravitational waves and electromagnetic signatures, University of Potsdam researchers are using supercomputers to understand binary neutron star mergers.

The mRNA vaccine for COVID-19 was the first of its kind, demonstrating the potential of a new biomedical paradigm. Computational research at the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz could open new opportunities for mRNA-based medicines.

Researchers at Justus Liebig University Giessen used HLRS supercomputing resources in the discovery of cluster glass, a new class of materials.

Models developed by researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt were instrumental in the Event Horizon Telescope consortium’s recent blockbuster findings.

HLRS supported researchers at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía of the Spanish Research Council (CSIC) in processing and analyzing a decade's worth of data gathered during an expansive, space-based project.

Researchers at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) are using high-performance computing to model how waterways’ sediment beds change and what those changes mean for pollutants moving downstream.

German-Research-Foundation-funded initiative supports research to better understand the movements of microorganisms in an effort to develop new environmental remediation efforts and drug delivery devices, among other applications. 

Researchers are working to identify materials and methods to improve water electrolysis, a promising approach that could more efficiently store energy generated from renewable sources. 

Physicists have spent 20 years trying to more precisely measure the so-called “magnetic moment” of subatomic particles called muons. Findings published this week call into question long-standing assumptions of particle physics.

A team from TU Dortmund is using high-performance computing to model how lasers could regulate spin dynamics in quantum dots. These small structures could have big implications for improving quantum computers and other advanced electronics. 

High-performance computing enables bioengineers to predict how laboratory results can be transferred to industrial conditions without loss of performance.

Supercomputing simulations support the design of a research station to improve wind turbine efficiency in hilly and mountainous regions.

Researchers from Goethe University in Frankfurt have been using HPC resources at HLRS and LRZ to support the massive Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) project. The results were released in the April edition of Astrophysical Journal Letters.

High-performance computing provides essential tools for drug discovery and epidemiological modeling in the fight against the global pandemic.

HLRS uses supercomputing and visualization to develop comprehensive models of urban environments, supports city planning in Herrenberg.

University of Duisburg-Essen researchers use HPC to model fuel jet flames in unprecedented detail, verifying experiments done by the German Aerospace Agency. 

TU Kaiserslautern researchers use molecular dynamics simulations to study solid-fluid interactions during scratching processes. 

HPC helps researchers understand experiments for observing real-time motion of lithium atoms in bi-layer graphene, paving the way for designing new materials for batteries and other electronics.

German scientists have succeeded in observing electron motion in real time by using laser pulses and supercomputing simulations. In their pursuit to better understand electrons’ behaviour during a chemical reaction, the researchers of the University of Paderborn and the Fritz Haber Institute Berlin have leveraged supercomputing resources at the HLRS to model this phenomenon. Their findings were recently published in Science.

HLRS high-performance computing resources and data-driven machine learning help researchers of the Institute of Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems (IKE) and the Institute of Aerospace Thermodynamics (ITLR) at the University of Stuttgart model how coal, nuclear, and geothermal power plants could be retrofitted for cleaner, safer, and more efficient and flexible operation.

A multi-institutional team comprised of researchers from the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies, the Max-Planck Institutes for Astrophysics and for Astronomy, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Harvard University, and the Center for Computational Astrophysics in New York gives the cosmology community a world-class simulation to study how the universe formed.

A team of researchers led by Prof. Dr. Britta Nestler at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and the Karlsruhe University of Applied Sciences works on the frontline of advanced material design, using computation to model new material properties.

With the help of HLRS's Hazel Hen supercomputer, an RWTH Aachen University team reaches a new milestone in modeling turbulence, paving the road to better power plant modeling and design in the future.

Scientists at the Paderborn University and the University of Duisburg–Essen recently published a paper in Nature about phase transitions. High performance computing resources at the HLRS enabled the investigators to explain the physics behind their unexpected discovery.