NEWS

Solar energy is one of the most promising, widely adopted renewable energy sources, but raising the efficiency of solar cells that convert light into electricity remains a challenge. Scientists have turned to the High-Performance Computing Center Stuttgart to understand how strategically designing imperfections in the system could lead to more efficient energy conversion.

A transitional system called Hunter will be installed in 2025, with an exascale system called Herder to follow in 2027.

Using HLRS supercomputing resources, scientists led by University of Helsinki physicist Minna Palmroth are exploring phenomena in near-Earth space that could never be investigated before.

As the largest annual HPC conference gets set to kick off in the United States, staff members at GCS centres are preparing for an active week of discussions, networking, and presentations.

Scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf are using high-performance computing to identify new materials for novel electronic and catalysis applications.

With the help of new observational data of gravitational waves and electromagnetic signatures, University of Potsdam researchers are using supercomputers to understand binary neutron star mergers.

The mRNA vaccine for COVID-19 was the first of its kind, demonstrating the potential of a new biomedical paradigm. Computational research at the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz could open new opportunities for mRNA-based medicines.

Researchers at Justus Liebig University Giessen used HLRS supercomputing resources in the discovery of cluster glass, a new class of materials.

Models developed by researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt were instrumental in the Event Horizon Telescope consortium’s recent blockbuster findings.

HLRS supported researchers at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía of the Spanish Research Council (CSIC) in processing and analyzing a decade's worth of data gathered during an expansive, space-based project.

Researchers at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) are using high-performance computing to model how waterways’ sediment beds change and what those changes mean for pollutants moving downstream.

German-Research-Foundation-funded initiative supports research to better understand the movements of microorganisms in an effort to develop new environmental remediation efforts and drug delivery devices, among other applications. 

With the 26th Call for Large-Scale Projects, the Gauss Centre for Supercomputing (GCS) allocated roughly 1.4 billion computing core hours to challenging national research projects requiring the support of high-performance computing (HPC) technology. In total, the GCS scientific steering granted 15 project access to Germany’s three national HPC centres.

Due to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic, the International Supercomputing Conference (ISC) will again be held in digital format only. The event will take place from June 24 to July 2, and the Gauss Centre for Supercomputing (GCS) will be there with a dedicated website and a virtual booth.

Researchers are working to identify materials and methods to improve water electrolysis, a promising approach that could more efficiently store energy generated from renewable sources. 

On May 1, 2021, the latest round of leading-edge large-scale projects began for users of the Gauss Centre for Supercomputing’s (GCS) three high-performance computing (HPC) systems—Hawk at the High-Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS), JUWELS at the Jülich Supercomputing Centre (JSC) and SuperMUC-NG at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre in Garching near Munich. As part of the organization’s 25th Call for Large-Scale Projects, GCS leadership approved 1.6 billion core hours for research projects for 14 simulation projects that met the strict qualification criteria set by the GCS Steering Committee.

Physicists have spent 20 years trying to more precisely measure the so-called “magnetic moment” of subatomic particles called muons. Findings published this week call into question long-standing assumptions of particle physics.

Week-long digital event provides opportunities for networking and presentations on the future of European HPC.

A team from TU Dortmund is using high-performance computing to model how lasers could regulate spin dynamics in quantum dots. These small structures could have big implications for improving quantum computers and other advanced electronics. 

Germany’s leading HPC centres collectively provide roughly 130 petaflops of performance, and the Jülich Supercomputing Centre’s Booster module for JUWELS leads to a top 3 ranking in the Green500 list.

The 24th Call for Large-Scale Projects welcomes users onto two of the latest GCS HPC systems—the Hawk system at HLRS and the JUWELS Booster module at JSC—in addition to LRZ’s flagship system, SuperMUC-NG. Both new and returning users representing a variety of scientific disciplines will see a significant performance increase from the new systems.

The three leading German HPC facilities have different approaches to tackling the issue of sustainable supercomputing, but all centres are dedicated to environmental stewardship.

High-performance computing enables bioengineers to predict how laboratory results can be transferred to industrial conditions without loss of performance.

Supercomputing simulations support the design of a research station to improve wind turbine efficiency in hilly and mountainous regions.

Despite having had only modest plans for online training courses in 2020, COVID-19 demanded that GCS centres’ training staffs evolve to ensure the organization delivered on one of its core missions—training scientists to make the best use of HPC resources.

HPC Projects EuroCC and CASTIEL aim at creating a Europe-wide network of national high-performance computing competence centers to enhance HPC skills, promote cooperation, and support the implementation of best practices across Europe.

Researchers from Goethe University in Frankfurt have been using HPC resources at HLRS and LRZ to support the massive Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) project. The results were released in the April edition of Astrophysical Journal Letters.

High-performance computing provides essential tools for drug discovery and epidemiological modeling in the fight against the global pandemic.

HLRS uses supercomputing and visualization to develop comprehensive models of urban environments, supports city planning in Herrenberg.

University of Duisburg-Essen researchers use HPC to model fuel jet flames in unprecedented detail, verifying experiments done by the German Aerospace Agency. 

Scientists pursuing research aimed at prevention, containment, remediation, or cures related to the coronavirus pandemic will be given expedited access to HPC resources at the Gauss Centre for Supercomputing.

As the first major supercomputing center in all of Europe, GCS member High-Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS) has received certification under the Eco-Management and Audit Scheme (EMAS). The accomplishment is the culmination of a multiyear effort to create and implement a comprehensive sustainability concept that guides HLRS's operation and will help shape its future growth.

TU Kaiserslautern researchers use molecular dynamics simulations to study solid-fluid interactions during scratching processes. 

HLRS, JSC, and LRZ staff collaborate to transfer files efficiently around the world in conjunction with the annual SC Asia conference.

Arrival of a new 26-petaflop high-performance computing system marks the beginning of a new era for advanced computational research in Stuttgart.

Stuttgart-based Gauss centre certified under the ISO 14001 norm and ISO 50001 framework.

Long-time GCS collaborator and user Prof. Dr. Ulrich Rüde discusses his views on the future of supercomputing.

With the 22nd GCS Large-Scale Call, the Gauss Centre for Supercomputing (GCS) scientific steering committee approved the allocation of 703 million core hours of computing time to eleven scientifically outstanding German research projects relying on the support of petascale-performance high-performance computing (HPC) technology.

Meet the three GCS centres, the High-Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS), Jülich Supercomputing Centre (JSC), and Leibniz Supercomputing Centre Garching (LRZ) at SC19 in Denver, Colorado (USA). The international conference for high-performance computing, networking, storage, and analysis, this year held from Nov. 17–22, 2019 at the Colorado Convention Center, is the annually recurring premier event for the global high-performance computing (HPC) community.

From sponsoring students and awards, to speaking and moderating discussions, to hosting guests at its “HPC Happy Hour,” GCS and centres’ staffs were heavily involved in this year’s International Supercomputing Conference.

HPC helps researchers understand experiments for observing real-time motion of lithium atoms in bi-layer graphene, paving the way for designing new materials for batteries and other electronics.

The record-breaking galaxy formation simulation, Illustris, which ran on the GCS HPC systems SuperMUC of LRZ and Hazel Hen of HLRS, can now adorn letters across the globe on a newly released postage stamp. The research projects of a multi-institution team were led by researchers at the Heidelberg Institute of Theoretical Studies (HITS) who are long-time users of GCS HPC ressources.

German scientists have succeeded in observing electron motion in real time by using laser pulses and supercomputing simulations. In their pursuit to better understand electrons’ behaviour during a chemical reaction, the researchers of the University of Paderborn and the Fritz Haber Institute Berlin have leveraged supercomputing resources at the HLRS to model this phenomenon. Their findings were recently published in Science.

The High-Performance Computing Center of the University of Stuttgart (HLRS) and Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) announced a joint collaboration to build a next-generation supercomputer. The new HPC system Hawk will be 3.5 times faster than HLRS’ current flagship HPC system Hazel Hen.

GCS users from Germany’s leading academic institutions are now able to move data to and from GCS facilities significantly faster—HLRS, JSC, and LRZ will be able to push Germany’s high-speed X-WiN network to its limits. Each GCS centre is connected by 2x100 gigabit-per-second data transfer speed, which is the fastest individual connection to X-WiN.

HLRS high-performance computing resources and data-driven machine learning help researchers of the Institute of Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems (IKE) and the Institute of Aerospace Thermodynamics (ITLR) at the University of Stuttgart model how coal, nuclear, and geothermal power plants could be retrofitted for cleaner, safer, and more efficient and flexible operation.

A multi-institutional team comprised of researchers from the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies, the Max-Planck Institutes for Astrophysics and for Astronomy, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Harvard University, and the Center for Computational Astrophysics in New York gives the cosmology community a world-class simulation to study how the universe formed.

GCS mourns the loss of Professor Dr.-Ing. Siegfried Wagner, founding member of the Gauss Centre for Supercomputing (GCS) and former Chairman of the GCS Scientific Steering Committee. Professor Wagner was a tireless advocate of high-performance computing (HPC) and its value to scientific engineering. He served as head of the Institute of Aerodynamics and Gas Dynamics of the University of Stuttgart from 1991 until 2004. 

A two-day workshop at the High-Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS) brought together infrastructure experts from German supercomputing centers to discuss strategies for building more sustainable systems.

The three GCS centres HLRS (High Performance Computing Center Stuttgart), JSC (Jülich Supercomputing Centre) and LRZ (Leibniz Supercomputing Centre, Garching near Munich) are working to implement better network tools and cooperation.

The three GCS centres HLRS, JSC, and LRZ are participating in this year's Supercomputing Conference (SC17) from November 12 -17, in Denver, Colorado (USA).

A team of researchers led by Prof. Dr. Britta Nestler at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and the Karlsruhe University of Applied Sciences works on the frontline of advanced material design, using computation to model new material properties.

The Gauss Centre for Supercomputing has been a unified force for ten years, combining the strength of Germany's three HPC centers to support leading edge computing research. A recent feature was published that highlights the past, present and future of GCS.

The German federal ministry praised GCS's accomplishments and announced newly increased support for supercomputing. The primary focus will be on improving power, efficiency, and training as computing moves toward exascale.

GCS has secured funding for another decade of excellence and innovation in high-performance computing from the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research and the science ministries of Baden-Württemberg, Bavaria, and North Rhein-Westphalia.

With the help of HLRS's Hazel Hen supercomputer, an RWTH Aachen University team reaches a new milestone in modeling turbulence, paving the road to better power plant modeling and design in the future.

Scientists at the Paderborn University and the University of Duisburg–Essen recently published a paper in Nature about phase transitions. High performance computing resources at the HLRS enabled the investigators to explain the physics behind their unexpected discovery.

The Gauss Centre for Supercomputing is pleased to announce that Prof. Dr. Michael M. Resch is the new chairman of the GCS Board of Directors. Resch has served as director of the High-Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS) for more than a decade, and is also director of the Institute for High-Performance Computing (IHR) at the University of Stuttgart.

Prof. Dr. Johanna Wanka, Federal Minister for Education and Research, was one of many who visited HLRS's booth at this year's CeBIT to learn more about AR technology and the benefits of high-performance computing.

The new training center of the High Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS) opened on March 7. The 2,003 sqm complex will now provide excellent facilities for the various types of HPC and IT trainings offered by HLRS.

Meet the High Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS) at CeBIT 2017 in Hannover (March 20-24). Representatives of the HRLS visualization department will demonstrate how HPC plays an essential role in vehicle development and safety research.

The new supercomputing world record was set by scaling ANSYS Fluent to more than 170,000 computer cores on the GCS high performance computing (HPC) system Hazel Hen hosted at HLRS.

An international team of researchers achieved a major break-through in the ongoing quest to profile dark matter. The spectacular findings were given additional honour by the Editorial Board of NATURE Magazine, where they were published on November 2.

The three member centres of the Gauss Centre for Supercomputing will present their research activities in the field of High Performance Computing (HPC) in their respective booths at this year's Supercomputing Conference (SC16), held Nov. 13-18 in Salt Lake City, USA.

The prime goal of these workshops, for which more than 20 application teams had qualified, was to improve the computational efficiency of applications by expanding their parallel scalability across the hundreds of thousands of compute cores of the GCS supercomputers JUQUEEN and SuperMUC.