NEWSFLASHES

The full-day event celebrated Bavaria’s flagship high-performance computing facility and its role in driving innovation over more than half a century.

With the 26th Call for Large-Scale Projects, the Gauss Centre for Supercomputing (GCS) allocated roughly 1.4 billion computing core hours to challenging national research projects requiring the support of high-performance computing (HPC) technology. In total, the GCS scientific steering granted 15 project access to Germany’s three national HPC centres.

Due to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic, the International Supercomputing Conference (ISC) will again be held in digital format only. The event will take place from June 24 to July 2, and the Gauss Centre for Supercomputing (GCS) will be there with a dedicated website and a virtual booth.

The Leibniz Supercomputing Centre welcomes HPC enthusiasts from around the world to learn more about the inner workings of high-performance computing on SuperMUC-NG during its biannual workshop.

Week-long digital event provides opportunities for networking and presentations on the future of European HPC.

Germany’s leading HPC centres collectively provide roughly 130 petaflops of performance, and the Jülich Supercomputing Centre’s Booster module for JUWELS leads to a top 3 ranking in the Green500 list.

The three leading German HPC facilities have different approaches to tackling the issue of sustainable supercomputing, but all centres are dedicated to environmental stewardship.

Despite having had only modest plans for online training courses in 2020, COVID-19 demanded that GCS centres’ training staffs evolve to ensure the organization delivered on one of its core missions—training scientists to make the best use of HPC resources.

Scientists pursuing research aimed at prevention, containment, remediation, or cures related to the coronavirus pandemic will be given expedited access to HPC resources at the Gauss Centre for Supercomputing.

HLRS, JSC, and LRZ staff collaborate to transfer files efficiently around the world in conjunction with the annual SC Asia conference.

Bavaria-based GCS centre comes home from the annual Supercomputing Conference with award for the second year in a row.

Long-time GCS collaborator and user Prof. Dr. Ulrich Rüde discusses his views on the future of supercomputing.

With the 22nd GCS Large-Scale Call, the Gauss Centre for Supercomputing (GCS) scientific steering committee approved the allocation of 703 million core hours of computing time to eleven scientifically outstanding German research projects relying on the support of petascale-performance high-performance computing (HPC) technology.

Multi-year effort culminates with LRZ receiving ISO/IEC 20000 and ISO/IEC 27001 certifications.

Meet the three GCS centres, the High-Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS), Jülich Supercomputing Centre (JSC), and Leibniz Supercomputing Centre Garching (LRZ) at SC19 in Denver, Colorado (USA). The international conference for high-performance computing, networking, storage, and analysis, this year held from Nov. 17–22, 2019 at the Colorado Convention Center, is the annually recurring premier event for the global high-performance computing (HPC) community.

From sponsoring students and awards, to speaking and moderating discussions, to hosting guests at its “HPC Happy Hour,” GCS and centres’ staffs were heavily involved in this year’s International Supercomputing Conference.

On May 27, representatives from the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) and the German Aerospace Agency (DLR) signed an agreement to partner on the Terra_Byte project.

Computational astrophysicists from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich use HPC to recreate the universe’s origins. Their work recently informed a new planetarium exhibition. 

The record-breaking galaxy formation simulation, Illustris, which ran on the GCS HPC systems SuperMUC of LRZ and Hazel Hen of HLRS, can now adorn letters across the globe on a newly released postage stamp. The research projects of a multi-institution team were led by researchers at the Heidelberg Institute of Theoretical Studies (HITS) who are long-time users of GCS HPC ressources.

The start-up phase of HPC system SuperMUC-NG was officially launched at LRZ on Monday, September 24, 2018. The transition from LRZ’s current SuperMUC machines (Phase I and II) to the third itineration of the SuperMUC series is scheduled to be completed in 2019.

Results of computationally intensive simulations, aimed at studying processes in the Earth’s mantle, can now be admired by the visitors of the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) in New York City. The newly added permanent exhibit was made possible thanks to a research project led by Professor Hans-Peter Bunge of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität in Munich (LMU) run on HPC system SuperMUC of the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ).

Two cooling technology solutions implanted at the Garching-based GCS centre recently took home first and second prize respectively in the 2018 German Data Centre Awards (Deutscher Rechenzentrumspreis).

Dr. Mie Andersen, from Technische Universität München (TUM), who is a Gauss Centre for Supercomputing (GCS) user, recently won the Gerhard Ertl Young Investigator Award 2018.

With the ongoing cyberattacks against Germany's government institutions in mind, ARD-alpha, a Germany public TV station offering educational programming, broadcasted a telecast dedicated to the topic "Internet Security".

The three GCS centres HLRS (High Performance Computing Center Stuttgart), JSC (Jülich Supercomputing Centre) and LRZ (Leibniz Supercomputing Centre, Garching near Munich) are working to implement better network tools and cooperation.

The three GCS centres HLRS, JSC, and LRZ are participating in this year's Supercomputing Conference (SC17) from November 12 -17, in Denver, Colorado (USA).

The Gauss Centre for Supercomputing has been a unified force for ten years, combining the strength of Germany's three HPC centers to support leading edge computing research. A recent feature was published that highlights the past, present and future of GCS.

The German federal ministry praised GCS's accomplishments and announced newly increased support for supercomputing. The primary focus will be on improving power, efficiency, and training as computing moves toward exascale.

An international team of researchers achieved a major break-through in the ongoing quest to profile dark matter. The spectacular findings were given additional honour by the Editorial Board of NATURE Magazine, where they were published on November 2.

The three member centres of the Gauss Centre for Supercomputing will present their research activities in the field of High Performance Computing (HPC) in their respective booths at this year's Supercomputing Conference (SC16), held Nov. 13-18 in Salt Lake City, USA.