RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS

Our research highlights serve as a collection of feature articles detailing recent scientific achievements on GCS HPC resources. 

World-class computing technologies allow researchers to employ a powerful tool to complement experimental and observation facilities. A multi-institutional group of astrophysicists has turned to the power of the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre’s flagship system to simulate in unprecedented detail a large part of our celestial neighborhood, with a specific focus on the so-called Coma cluster.

A research collaboration including a team based at the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics has long leveraged world-class supercomputing resources to understand how our universe came to exist in its current form. Building on the successes of the previous “Millennium,” “Illustris,” and “IllustrisTNG” projects, the researchers are simulating dark matter in unprecedented detail in the context of the “MillenniumTNG” project.

Technical University of Munich scientists, working with computational experts at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre, perform massive simulations focused on understanding turbulent interactions of gas in high-pressure environments.

Models developed by researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt were instrumental in the Event Horizon Telescope consortium’s recent blockbuster findings.

Researchers at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München and their partners at the Technical University of Munich have developed innovative ways to assess risk for two of the Earth’s most destructive disasters.

Despite being among the most researched topics on supercomputers, a fundamental understanding of the effects of turbulent motion on fluid flows still eludes scientists. A new approach developed at TU Darmstadt and running at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre aims to change that.

Using a combination of CT-scans, other available patient data, and simulations, researchers are forging a path toward personalizing medicine and improving outcomes for patients with acute respiratory illnesses. In collaboration with the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre, researchers from the Technical University of Munich are developing new computational methods to put insights from more accurate modelling and simulation into the hands of medical professionals.

From touch screens and advanced electronic sensors to better drug delivery devices, graphene has become one of the most promising new materials in recent decades. In an effort to produce cheap, defect-free graphene in larger quantities, researchers from the Technical University of Munich have been using GCS HPC resources to develop more efficient methods for producing graphene at the industrial scale.

Physicists have spent 20 years trying to more precisely measure the so-called “magnetic moment” of subatomic particles called muons. Findings published this week call into question long-standing assumptions of particle physics.

A multi-institution team from Australia and Germany simulates turbulence happening on both sides of the so-called “sonic scale,” opening the door for more detailed and realistic galaxy formation simulations.

Supercomputing simulations support the design of a research station to improve wind turbine efficiency in hilly and mountainous regions.

Researchers from Goethe University in Frankfurt have been using HPC resources at HLRS and LRZ to support the massive Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) project. The results were released in the April edition of Astrophysical Journal Letters.

High-performance computing provides essential tools for drug discovery and epidemiological modeling in the fight against the global pandemic.

TUM researchers partner with LRZ HPC experts to improve access to and organization of protein databases. 

TU Kaiserslautern researchers use molecular dynamics simulations to study solid-fluid interactions during scratching processes. 

Helmut-Schmidt University scientists combine simulation with experimental investigations to understand complex fluid-structure interactions to design safer buildings.

Research collaboration between the Australian National University, Intel, and LRZ nominated for Best Scientific Visualization & Data Analytics Showcase award at SC19.

Combining earthquake and tsunami computer models of the 2018 tsunami in Palu, researchers identified underlying causes of the deadly tsunami.

Canadian-German partnership simulates the climate in Quebec and Bavaria over 150 years, primarily focusing on extreme flooding events. The team’s results were recently published in Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology.

Researchers employ HPC to help bring spray simulations to a commercial level. The team’s work was featured on the cover of the Journal of Fluid Mechanics. 

Theoretical physicists and experimentalists collaborate to identify dopants capable of enabling new designs of semiconducting materials.

Researchers at LMU and TUM in Munich are up for best paper at SC17 after simulating one of the largest, most violent earthquakes in history.

Researchers at the Technical University of Munich are using satellite imagery and supercomputing to predict city buildings’ risks for structural degradation and damage.