ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY

Environment and Energy

Principal Investigator: Kirsten Warrach-Sagi, University of Hohenheim (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: WRFCLIM

The University of Hohenheim contributed with five regional climate simulations to the multi-model ensemble of EURO-CORDEX. The ensemble data is required to analyze the climate change signals in Europe and to provide high-resolution products for climate impact research and politics for 1971 to 2100.

Environment and Energy

Principal Investigator: Thomas Jung, Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI), (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: GCS-AWCM

Results from high-resolution simulations with the sea ice-ocean model FESOM, formulated on unstructured meshes, are presented in which ocean eddies are resolved in the North Atlantic region. By resolving ocean eddies, these features are represented by the laws of physics rather than empirical rules of thumb, as done in most existing climate simulations. A comparison with satellite data suggests that the simulated eddy fields start to become indistinguishable from observations, showing that the model passes the climatic Turing Test. It is argued that these high-resolution models have the potential to significantly increase our understanding of how the climate in general and the ocean in particular will be evolve in a warming world.

Environment and Energy

Principal Investigator: Ralf Ludwig, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: pr94lu

Hydrometeorological extremes, such as droughts and floods are one of the grand challenges of our future and pose great interest and concern for water management and public safety. Hence, the ClimEx project disaggregates the response of the climate system into changing anthropogenic forcing and natural variability by analyzing a novel large-ensemble of climate simulations, operated using High-Performance Computing. The comprehensive new dataset (CRCM5-LE) generated 50 transient independent and evenly likely realizations of the past and the future climate (1950-2099) over two large domains (Europe, Eastern North America) in high spatial (12km) and temporal (1h-1d) resolution. The resulting 7500 model years allow for a thorough analysis of...

Environment and Energy

Principal Investigator: Dominikus Heinzeller, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Meteorology and Climate Research, Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany)

HPC Platform used: JUQUEEN of JSC

Local Project ID: hka19

Using the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS), four years of climate simulations at convection-permitting resolutions where carried out using a variable 30-3km resolution mesh, transitioning the so-called gray zone of convection around 5-10km. The comprehensive data set generated following the protocol of the CORDEX Flagship Pilot Study (FPS) on convection-permitting climate simulations will allow the CORDEX-FPS community to study the added value of global, variable-resolution simulations down to convective scales over traditional approaches employing regional climate models and/or coarse horizontal resolutions.

Environment and Energy

Principal Investigator: Ronald E. Cohen, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: pr92ma

Without its magnetic field, life on Earth’s surface is impossible, since the magnetic field screens us from deadly solar radiation. In order to gain a better understanding of the generation of Earth’s magnetic field and heat flow in the Earth--which is crucial for understanding Earth's history--scientists have performed large scale simulations of crystalline and liquid iron alloys at conditions of Earth’s core, up to 6000K and over 300 million atmospheres of pressure, and have computed the electrical and thermal conductivity. The computationally very intensive first-principles molecular dynamics simulations for fluids required more than 60 million core hours of computing time on SuperMUC.

Environment and Energy

Principal Investigator: Hans-Peter Bunge, Geophysics Section,Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: pr48ca

Much of what one refers to as geological activity of the Earth arises from convective processes within the Earth’s mantle that transport heat from the deep interior of our planet to the surface. One of the major challenges in the geosciences is to constrain the distribution and magnitude of the resulting vast forces that drive plate tectonics. Mantle flow also provides boundary conditions - thermal and mechanical - to other key elements of the Earth system (e.g., geodesy, geodynamo/geomagnetism). This makes fluid dynamic studies of the mantle essential to our understanding of how the entire planet works. In a long-term effort, scientists at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München strive for improved computational models of the Earth's...

Environment and Energy

Principal Investigator: Clemens Simmer, Meteorological Institute, University of Bonn (Germany)

HPC Platform used: JUQUEEN/JURECA (JSC)

Local Project ID: hbn29

Data Assimilation is an integral tool to enable precise forecasts and becomes increasingly important to derive the values of uncertain parameters due to lack of observations. Numerical models of Earth system compartments are coupled in order to simulate physically consistent water and energy fluxes in the subsurface-landsurface-atmosphere system. Such model systems become increasingly important to analyze and understand the complex processes at boundaries of terrestrial compartments and interdependencies of states across these boundaries. As such, data assimilation for these coupled systems needs to be developed.

Environment and Energy

Principal Investigator: Juan Pedro Mellado, Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg (Germany)

HPC Platform used: JUQUEEN of JSC

Local Project ID: hhh07

The planetary boundary layer (PBL) is the lower layer of the troposphere, the layer that directly feels surface effects on time scales smaller than a day. Planetary boundary layers are important in climatology—modulating the fluxes between atmosphere, land and ocean—, and in meteorology—influencing weather conditions—, but key properties remain poorly understood, largely because the PBL is turbulent, and understanding and characterizing the multi-scale nature of turbulence remains challenging. High-performance computing and direct numerical simulations are decisively contributing to advance our understanding of PBL properties.

Environment and Energy

Principal Investigator: Gerd Schädler, Institute of Meteorology and Climate Research, Department Troposphere Research (IMK-TRO), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: HRCM

Modelling of the regional present day as well as future climate is of great interest both scientifically as well as for applications. The “Regional Climate and Water Cycle Group” at KIT Karlsruhe uses the COSMO-CLM regional climate model for detailed climate simulations in various parts of the world. Many of these quite expensive and storage intensive runs are performed on Hazel Hen at HLRS. After giving a motivation for high resolution climate modelling, the scientists briefly describe some technical aspects like nesting and ensemble building and then go to a short presentation of some results concerning the future climate in Baden-Württemberg.

Environment and Energy

Principal Investigator: Dr. Alice-Agnes Gabriel, Prof. Heiner Igel, Department für Geo- und Umweltwissenschaften, Geophysik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: pr45fi

Understanding the physics of earthquake rupture occurring on multiple scales and at depths that cannot be probed directly is a ‘Grand Challenge’ of Earth sciences. Geophysicists at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität use the in-house-developed SeisSol earthquake simulation software to improve fundamental comprehension of earthquake dynamics by numerical simulation of complicated wave and rupture phenomena.

Environment and Energy

Principal Investigator: Xiaoxiang Zhu, Signal Processing in Earth Observation, Technical University of Munich and Remote Sensing Technology Institute, German Aerospace Center (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: pr45ne

Static 3-D city models are well established for many applications such as architecture, urban planning, navigation, tourism, and disaster management. However, they do not represent the dynamic behavior of the buildings and other infrastructure (e.g. dams, bridges, railway lines). Such temporal change, i.e. 4-D, information is demanded in various aspect of urban administration, especially for the long-term monitoring of building deformation. Very high resolution spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Earth observation satellites, like the German TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X provide for the first time the possibility to derive both shape and deformation parameters of urban infrastructure on a continuous basis.

Environment and Energy

Principal Investigator: Herlina Herlina, Institute for Hydromechanics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Germany

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: pr28ca

Gas exchange across water surfaces receives increasing attention because of its importance to the global greenhouse budget. At present, most models used to estimate the gas flux only consider wind-shear. To improve the accuracy of the predictions a detailed study of buoyancy-driven gas transfer, which is a major contributor at low to moderate wind-speed, is necessary.  The main challenge lies in resolving the extremely thin gas concentration boundary layer. To address this, direct numerical simulations (DNS) of gas transfer induced by surface-cooling were performed on SuperMUC using a numerical scheme that is capable of resolving the thin diffusive layers on a relatively coarse mesh while avoiding spurious oscillations of the scalar...

Environment and Energy

Principal Investigator: Xavier Capet, CNRS, LOCEAN laboratory, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France)

HPC Platform used: Hazel Hen of HLRS

Local Project ID: PP14102208

The SMOC (SubMesoscale Ocean Modelling for Climate) project aimed to shed light on the role of submesoscale turbulent processes in the overall functioning of the ocean. Leveraging HPC power, the researchers in particular tried to get answers to: A) how deep do submesoscale fronts penetrate and can they be a significant source of dissipation for the ocean circulation away from the surface?, and B) to which extent do submesoscale fronts participate in the transfer into the deep ocean of the near-inertial energy injected by the wind at the ocean surface?

Environment and Energy

Principal Investigator: Andreas Kempf, Institut für Verbrennung und Gasdynamik, Lehrstuhl Fluiddynamik, Universität Duisburg-Essen (Germany)

HPC Platform used: JUQUEEN of JSC

Local Project ID: hdu18

Turbulence-chemistry interaction in well characterized partially premixed and premixed laboratory-scale experiments has been investigated numerically by two different methods (M1 & M2) based on the large eddy simulation (LES) technique. It could be shown that the developed transported filtered density function method (M1) is capable of reproducing the turbulence chemistry interaction in the investigated opposed jet flame configurations. The flame resolved simulations (M2) revealed the importance of flame wrinkling and scalar geometry for flame propagation and allowed for further development of sub-filter models for future LES.

Environment and Energy

Principal Investigator: Rainer Grauer, Institut für Theoretische Physik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum (Germany)

HPC Platform used: JUQUEEN of JSC

Local Project ID: hbo22

Using high resolution direct numerical simulations of a flow seeded with particles around a sphere, an international research team aimed at studying the hydrodynamic problem of collisions among particles in the potentially turbulent wake of a sphere. HPC system JUQUEEN of JSC served as computing platform for this challenging simulation project.

Environment and Energy

Principal Investigator: Eckart Laurien, Institute of Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems, University of Stuttgart (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hermit of HLRS

Local Project ID: TurboCon

Two-phase flows with water droplets greatly affect the thermal-hydraulic behaviour in the containment of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). In order to predict the local thermal-hydraulic behaviour in a real containment in the case of a severe accident, scientists of the University of Stuttgart generated a three-dimensional geometry of a model containment based on a German PWR. 

Environment and Energy

Principal Investigator: Martin Baumann, Universitätsrechenzentrum, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg (Germany)

HPC Platform used: JUQUEEN of JSC

Local Project ID: hka14

The dynamic behavior of the atmosphere is driven by processes on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. In a project run by scientists of the Heidelberg University, those parts of model systems which describe the fluid dynamics and the temperature evolution were investigated. The models are formulated in terms of the velocity, temperature, pressure, and density. The researchers employ a hierarchy of different physical models with an increasing degree of complexity. The task of predicting the evolution of tropical cyclones is a typical challenging example.

Environment and Energy

Principal Investigator: Thorsten Lutz, Institute of Aerodynamics and Gas Dynamics, University of Stuttgart (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hermit and Hornet of HLRS

Local Project ID: WEAloads

In order to develop economic, efficient, and reliable wind turbines, the knowledge of the mechanisms that evoke transient aerodynamic loads effecting blades, tower, and the nacelle is essential. Using high performance computing technologies, researchers of the University of Stuttgart used high-fidelity Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods to accurately predict these unsteady loads. Particular interest was paid on the interaction of wind turbine and atmospheric boundary layer.

Environment and Energy

Principal Investigator: Thomas Gruber, Institute of Astronomical and Physical Geodesy, Technische Universität München (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: pr32qu

Exploiting the computing power and memory capacities of HPC system SuperMUC, scientists of the Technische Universität München aimed at providing a global high resolution gravity field model with hitherto unprecedented accuracy and resolution. The model can be now be used by the scientific community as a surface reference for climate studies and it serves e.g. as main input for geophysical analyses and for the determination of the ocean circulation patterns.

Environment and Energy

Principal Investigator: Heinz Pitsch, Institute for Combustion Technology, RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: pr45di

Scientists of the RWTH Aachen University have carried out a peta-scale direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a temporally evolving lean premixed methane/air jet flame. The DNS is intented to closely mimic gas turbine combustion and can be regarded as an idealized representation of a premixed flame element inside a jet burner. To realize high resolution of flame and turbulence and to obtain converged statistics, the simulation domain was discretized with almost three billion grid points which together with the chemistry model resulted in nearly 100 billion degrees of freedom.

Environment and Energy

Principal Investigator: Dieter Kranzlmüller, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: pr45de

Predicting weather and climate and its impacts on the environment, including hazards such as floods, droughts and landslides, continues to be one of the main challenges of the 21st century – in particular for the European region as it is exposed to intense Atlantic synoptic perturbations. Scientists performed for the first time long climate simulations over the European domain at a very fine cloud-permitting resolution of about 4 km with explicitly resolved convection and a sharp representation of orography, thanks to the possibility of running very computationally and data storage demanding simulations on SuperMUC.

Environment and Energy

Principal Investigator: Andreas Kempf, Institut für Verbrennung und Gasdynamik, Lehrstuhl Fluiddynamik, Universität Duisburg-Essen (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: pr84mu

Scientists of the University of Duisburg-Essen pushed further the state of the art by simulating large-scale coal and biomass flames in furnaces that have been studied in detail experimentally – the Instituto Superior Técnico and the Brigham Young University furnace. Within this project, the largest large eddy simulation (LES) of coal combustion ever to be computed provided high-resolution scalar profiles within the furnace, which allowed investigating the conditions that coal particles are subjected to in these applications and to compute particle combustion histories. LES is able to provide insights to the phenomena occurring in this type of application that are currently not available through experimental means.

Environment and Energy

Principal Investigator: Prof. Dr. Wolf Gero Schmidt, Theoretical Materials Physics Group, Paderborn University (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hermit and Hornet of HLRS

Local Project ID: AdFerro1

Leveraging the high-performance computing capabilities of the HLRS supercomputing infrastructure, scientists of the Theoretical Materials Physics Group of the Paderborn University managed to trace interface defects in amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells. Visualizing the processes with atomic resolution they were able to characterize the processes that compromise the solar cells' efficiency. The findings will help to optimize the solar cells further and to decrease production costs.

Environment and Energy

Principal Investigator: Volker Wulfmeyer, Institute of Physics and Meteorology, University of Hohenheim

HPC Platform used: Hornet of HLRS

Local Project ID: XXL_WRF

Thanks to the availability of HLRS’s petascale HPC system Hornet, researchers of the Institute of Physics and Meteorology of the University of Hohenheim were able to run a highly complex climate simulation for a time period long enough to cover various extreme weather events on the Northern hemisphere at a previously unmatched spatial resolution. Deploying the highly scalable Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model on 84,000 compute cores of Hornet, the achieved results confirm an extraordinary quality with respect to the simulation of fine scale meteorological processes and extreme events.

Environment and Energy

Principal Investigator: Christoph Pflaum, Department of Computer Science, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: h0672

Organic Photovoltaics are a promising thin-film solar cell technology since all the constituting layers can be processed from solution processable materials. In order to improve the efficiency of those solar cells it is necessary to optimize their light trapping ability. Different techniques were evaluated in a research project on SuperMUC of LRZ.

Environment and Energy

Principal Investigator: Kirsten Warrach-Sagi, Institute of Physics and Meteorology, University of Hohenheim, Stuttgart (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hermit of HLRS

Local Project ID: WFRCLIM

Scientists from the University of Hohenheim (Stuttgart/Germany) aim to investigate and to improve the performance of regional climate simulations in Europe with the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model. The model is operated from 12 km down to the convection permitting scale of 3 km, for advancing process understanding.

Environment and Energy

Principal Investigator: Sebastian Remmler, Lehrstuhl für Aerodynamik und Strömungsmechanik, Technische Universität München (Germany)

HPC Platform used: Hermit of HLRS

Local Project ID: DNSGRAW

The flow in the earth's atmosphere involves many complex features. One of these features are so-called gravity waves. They become important as soon as they break somewhere in the atmosphere, since this breaking results in a strong patch of turbulence for no apparent reason. In order to improve the basic understanding of the breaking process, scientists conducted high-resolution simulations of different types of gravity-wave breaking events.

Environment and Energy

Principal Investigator: Markus Uhlmann, Institute for Hydrodynamics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology/KIT (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: pr58do

Scientists of the Institute for Hydrodynamics of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have – for the first time – performed high-fidelity numerical simulations of the formation of sediment patterns in a channel flow configuration.

Environment and Energy

Principal Investigator: Henk A. Dijkstra, Institute for Marine and Atmosphere Research Utrecht (IMAU), Utrecht University (The Netherlands)

HPC Platform used: Hermit of HLRS

Local Project ID: PP13081679

Using the computing capabilities of HLRS system Hermit, a team of scientists used the Community Earth System Model (CESM) with a strongly eddying ocean submodel to study the presence of ocean eddies on the sensitivity of the Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC) in the Atlantic Ocean to the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) freshwater anomalies.

Environment and Energy

Principal Investigator: Christoph Scheurer, Fakultät für Chemie, Technische Universtität München (Germany)

HPC Platform used: SuperMUC of LRZ

Local Project ID: pr000aa

A team of scientists of the Technische Universtität München employed an instantaneous steady-state approximation to present steady-state reactivity data from kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) simulations in the form of an interpolated data field as boundary conditions for the computational fluid dynamics simulation.Their goal was to test the capability of the code in managing complex computational domains, thus allowing for the first time to extend kMC simulations to geometries and conditions relevant to technological applications.